How are we connected? | Feat. E-think, Manon Bril & many others | EPISODE # 9

General scientific debates. Presentations of new technologies (not directly related to renewable energies or biofuels or other themes developed in other sub-sectors) forums).
User avatar
thibr
I posted 500 messages!
I posted 500 messages!
posts: 569
Registration: 07/01/18, 09:19
x 194

How are we connected? | Feat. E-think, Manon Bril & many others | EPISODE # 9

by thibr » 11/02/21, 21:27

is this the right place to post this video?

To be precise, it should be noted that there are in reality two large families of networks: “small-worlds” characterized by groupings and short paths, and “scale-free” characterized by the presence of hubs. In practice, most networks are * both * small-world and scale-free and therefore exhibit all three properties at the same time as I describe in the video.

The mechanism which produces these graphs will be different for “scale-free” and for “small-world”. If the new points preferentially connect to the big ones, this will give a “scale-free” (and therefore hubs). To produce small-worlds, you need a preferential attachment to neighbors and some random links. For simplicity, I describe in the video a unique mechanism which produces “scale-free” and “small-world”, but they are often described separately in the scientific literature.

Finally on the law of short paths in random networks [Paul Erdös model], the length of the path between two points hardly depends on the size of the network (as indicated at 3:00), but there is however a strong dependence on the number of links that we have placed in the network. In a random network with few social links, the length of the path between two points can be relatively long.
1 x

 


  • Similar topics
    Replies
    views
    Last message

Back to "Science and Technology"

Who is online ?

Users browsing this forum : No registered users and 11 guests