Food and hunger: the dead of junk food and malnutrition

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jlt22
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View jlt22 » 30/01/11, 20:52

Some stripping videos of the suffering that humans impose on animals,
Sensitive souls refrain:

Castration of pigeons:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3gQOuqpwpQ

Sorting of the chicks before their departure for breeding:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKdx2ZtB8Wc&NR=1

Ritual slaughter of cattle (need to register to see the video):
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xcmnwe_abattage-rituel-halal_animals

The pork industry:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xcalgk_abattage-avec-etourdissement-la-rea_webcam
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Obamot
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View Obamot » 30/01/11, 22:06

Janic wrote:Good evening obamot
Much of humanity still eats meat. ... Carnivores! This is the dark side of the laws of nature, and we are apparently not yet mature enough to all become vegans ... but it may come one day.

It is obvious that humanity must evolve, but in its head (awareness) not in its body.
Below an excerpt from my book

... the man's close relatives were fruit-eating ... but ate a few insects gleaned here and there from the tree trunks ... and that does not mean that the close relatives of our close relatives were not omnivores .

Other than that I will not take a position on a book (not right away, moreover I note in the blog, some blunders and syllogisms), although it is a very interesting initiative to implement! And that I think the dimension “'Religare' + respect for nature”, is not uninteresting.

We must indeed be careful with doctrines surreptitiously moving towards choice options, which ultimately turn out not to be agreed or even too determined in any field whatsoever, including the scientific field (writing an exhaustive manuscript would be a bit to compare to the sisyphus myth as this 'science' is constantly evolving ... even though the results do not can be assessed only individually, not to say THAT locally). I think there is no universal miracle recipe, for each tribe to find what suits it best, based on what is available, where it lives!

By cons I believe very strongly:
- in the pleasure found in the search of good priorities to place not to be tipped!
- In simple and easily applicable methods! And especially in the conviviality and the joy of sharing and respecting each other!
- In the acid / base balance found in the consumption of local products, very fresh, and in season!
- A careful choice: the method of conservation, preparation of raw food and the cooking system of cooked food!
- And above all, in a regulation in the media regarding the cooking recipe type programs where we most often walk on the head nutrition and dietetics question ...
- In new laws protecting the commators, which would not go in the direction of what wishes the hygienic agro-food industry to death, but in function of public health stricto sensu! (A 'stabilized' food being a food ... dead, reason why it keeps for a long time ... the good deal) It is therefore no greater scandal than seeing consumers cheated, buying products that are harmful proven 'with confidence', because laws authorize this state of affairs!

"Stop illness: Place for real health"
"The omnivorous man, a scam?"

Something must have escaped me, but I did not read the precision according to which the goal would be to pass from the mode of digestion by putrefaction to the mode said by fermentation? We must say EVERYTHING, we have the right to know!
... Digestion by putrefaction has nothing to do directly with the consumption of meat products themselves, if it remains in the right proportion! I say for those who are not vegan like you: even if the consumption of meat promotes this, we can very well be in a digestion cycle by fermentation, while eating meat ... The problem does not come from there but the implementation of good "food combinations" depending on what is available where we live.

And then the hardest thing to swallow (^^) is that it remains above all a personal, and / or cultural choice, whether we like it or not! Because even in the era of Big Brother, everyone is still choosing what to put on their plate! (And again ... for those fortunate enough to be able to do so ... emotional thought for those who don't)
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dedeleco
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View dedeleco » 31/01/11, 02:29

Completely agree with janic, and it should be added that originally, in the time of the dinosaurs, we were nocturnal animals, eating insects and waste and then we diverged from bats and rats, to live by day, to eat fruit, hence 2-color eyes (other mammals) then 3 colors (to see these red fruits well), then to walk in the trees with the necessary relief view, eyes from the front looking in front of a flat face (and not on the side) and finally orbits closed by a bone behind the eyes.

We are good at eating everything, insects, fruits, roots, rare meat, with over 400000 years of cooked food that has helped develop our brains.

For 10000 years we have grown accustomed by natural selection to milk and cereals and bread and gluten, to agriculture, with genetic modifications that we do not all have, hence intolerance to these foods for some !!
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dedeleco
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View dedeleco » 31/01/11, 03:08

Any different food, even harmless like milk and bread, changes the way our genes work.
The food our grandparents ate has an effect!

for example, if they have suffered famines, their children and grandchildren are affected with more diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, etc.

This is a recent discovery: lepigenetics that revolutionizes genetics, since our genes are activated or inactivated by these epigenetic mechanisms, depending on our life, what we eat !! !!
see this basic article among those in nutrigenomics very interesting:

Epigenetics: Tales of adversity
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v4 ... 8S20a.html
http://www.nature.com/nature/outlook/nu ... index.html
http://www.nature.com/nature/index.html
It is well established that a pregnant woman's habits affect the health of her unborn child, but the extent of the impact is less well known. Recent studies of tragic historical events, namely the Dutch Hongerwinter and the Great Chinese Famine, have begun to highlight the trans-generational relationship between food and genes.

The Hongerwinter (hunger winter) began late in 1944 towards the end of the Second World War. Food supplies in the northern and western regions of Nazi-occupied Holland became increasingly limited as the Germans halted overland transport of goods into Amsterdam and nearby cities.

Exacerbating this blockade, the harsh winter froze canals - cutting off a vital supply route. Rations in cities dropped to as few as 500 calories per day, less than a quarter of the recommended intake, until the country was liberated in May 1945, but not before 18,000 people starved to death.

Many children conceived during the Hongerwinter were small and underweight. What's more, certain health problems have persisted long into their adult lives. Compared to their siblings conceived before or after the famine, the Hongerwinter children are at increased risk for obesity, for example. A propensity for obesity was also found in children of the 1968–1970 Biafra famine in a recent study in Nigeria ...
The Great Chinese Famine, from 1958 to 1961, was caused by a combination of leader Mao Zedong's agricultural policies during the Great Leap Forward, widespread mismanagement and severe weather. Tens of millions of people died. Studies of Chinese born during this period link prenatal famine exposure to an increased risk of schizophrenia - a link also found in the Dutch Hongerwinter cohort.

“These extreme events offer special opportunities for research in humans that you might not otherwise have,” says Lambert Lumey, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, New York, who is studying the effects of the Hongerwinter. There are obvious ethical issues and long time spans involved that make recreating the circumstances of famine impossible. “These events are crucial to helping us develop and discover underlying disease mechanisms,” says Lumey.
Tell-tale DNA

Scientists have discovered that certain genes of children conceived during a prolonged period of starvation receive special epigenetic 'tags' through a process called methylation - a gene modification that typically deactivates a gene, but does not alter the genetic code. Methylation is part of normal development, but patterns vary across individuals.

Nearly six decades after the famine, Lumey and colleagues isolated DNA from Hongerwinter individuals. They found a below-average methylation of the insulin-like growth factor II gene (IGF2), which codes for a growth hormone critical to gestation. Decreasing the methylation of IGF2 should increase the expression of the hormone. In contrast, later studies in this cohort found increased methylation of five other genes, among them genes associated with cholesterol transport and aging, as well as the gene that produces IL-10, which has been linked with schizophrenia.

The mechanisms of these epigenetic changes and whether they have a bearing on disease remain unclear. “In humans, these are the $ 100,000 questions,” says epigeneticist Robert Waterland from Baylor College of Medicine in Texas.

Lumey hopes to study the children of the 'tagged' individuals to see if these changes persist into the next generation. Epigenetic information is almost fully reset in very early development, so the outcome, he says, is difficult to predict. “This is an important question regardless of what the data will later show.”

Nevertheless, studies on these extreme events “provide the first convincing evidence that early nutritional exposure causes a persistent change in epigenetic regulation in humans, ”Notes Waterland. “It's a proof of principle.”

Lumey is now looking to high-throughput sequencing methods to measure genome-wide DNA methylation. "We expect that this will tell us whether there are more epigenetic differences between prenatally exposed individuals and their unexposed siblings, than the ones we found studying candidate loci," says epigeneticist Bastiaan Heijmans of Leiden University in the Netherlands, who works with Lumey. If these modifications are indeed widespread throughout the genome, the cumulative effect of famine-induced epigenetic alterations might play a substantial role in disease progression.

Other research has shown that less-extreme diets also affect methylation patterns and disease susceptibility. For example, folic acid is an important supplement for pregnant women to help prevent neural tube defects in developing embryos. It has been shown to increase the methylation of IGF2, hinting that it works through an epigenetic mechanism.

Nevertheless, studying such catastrophes provides researchers with valuable information that is not otherwise available, revealing that the aftermath of famine and prenatal malnutrition lasts long after help arrives with life-saving food.


So eat too rich and ljunk food changes our brain which ends up being drugged and dependent on this food !!
Long-Term, High-Fat Diet Alters Mice Brains: Brain Changes May Contribute to Cycles of Weight Gain
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 112727.htm
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dedeleco
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View dedeleco » 31/01/11, 03:26

Long-Term, High-Fat Diet Alters Mice Brains: Brain Changes May Contribute to Cycles of Weight Gain
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 112727.htm
Fatty foods tap the pleasure centers of the brain, the same areas triggered by cocaine or heroin. Reyes and her colleagues explored whether these pathways could be modified on a molecular level by eating a high-fat diet for a long period of time. The researchers found that the genes involved with reward were altered in mice fed a high-fat diet for more than six months. The authors suggest the changes, which may promote cravings for fatty foods, could have far-reaching consequences.

Many people struggle with unhealthy cycles of weight loss and gain. This study illustrates the biological challenges of breaking out of this cycle. "Tthese results provide further insight into the health consequences of long-term, high-fat diets, and suggest one explanation for why some people face such difficulty in the path to weight loss and healthier eating, "Reyes said.



High-Fat Diet Could Promote Development Of Alzheimer's Disease
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 103107.htm

Fatty Food Can Weaken the Immune System
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 132526.htm

Mice Run Faster On High-Grade Oil
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 081120.htm
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Janic
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View Janic » 31/01/11, 09:04

Obamot hello
Something must have escaped me, but I did not read the precision according to which the goal would be to pass from the mode of digestion by putrefaction to the mode said by fermentation? We must say EVERYTHING, we have the right to know!
... Digestion by putrefaction has nothing to do directly with the consumption of meat products themselves, if it remains in the right proportion! I say for those who are not vegan like you: even if the consumption of meat promotes this, we can very well be in a digestion cycle by fermentation, while eating meat ... The problem does not come from there but the implementation of good "food combinations" depending on what is available where we live.

It has been experienced to give only meat to students to note the effects: including loose teeth with bleeding, scarring and other organic disorders. The same experiment attempted only with fruit and no organic disorder found. Admittedly, there are only very few individuals consuming ONLY meat, but this is enough to show that the intestinal length being too long, the meat quickly putrefies and intoxicates the organism. The plant accompanying the animal in the digestion process distorts the findings.
Then, of course, the different civilizations that preceded us did not do food philosophy but used what nature made available to them, whether vegetable or animal.
But we have moved from consuming meat, at the margins, with high physical expenditure favoring elimination, to a sedentary society, with low activity and high animal consumption. This has resulted in so-called civilization diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and of course cancer. So: either our societies are adjusting for their survival, or they are continuing in the same direction and the effects will be accentuated.
It is ecology applied internally while currently it is especially concerned with external ecology, certainly important for the future of humanity too.

Deleleco
I cannot give an opinion on what were or could be our distant ancestors. What matters today is whether it is the result of evolution or a permanence of the human constitution. In addition to what I have just underlined, the question is: will we continue to develop terrible diseases such as cancer (only part of which is linked to pollution) or will we seek a solution that does not don't go through mutilation, chemistry or nuclear (when it works!)
The Americans (maniacs of the surveys) found that a religious California community had half as many cancers as the surrounding society, their only different factor being their mode of food essentially vegetarian. Another religious group, Mormon, stood out because there was no case of autism unlike the rest of American society where the rate of autism is around 1 in 150. This same absence of autism found in another medical group in New York. The only common point between these groups: the refusal of vaccinations (internal pollutant) and these examples are in sufficient quantity to ask substantive questions.
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Obamot
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View Obamot » 31/01/11, 09:17

Janic wrote:It has been experienced to give only meat to students to note the effects: including loose teeth with bleeding, scarring and other organic disorders.
... ah but it's even worse: death from scurvy ... of which you have just described some symptoms!
http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scorbut

... but this has nothing to do directly with the length of the intestines, but with the absence of vitamin "C", which we must consume every day! Sorry, but “omnivorous” doesn't mean we have to eat only meat! For the rest, yes, there is common sense in your words.
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Janic
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View Janic » 31/01/11, 10:38

Hello obamo
... but this has nothing to do directly with the length of the intestines, but with the absence of vitamin "C", which we must consume every day! Sorry, but “omnivorous” doesn't mean we have to eat only meat! For the rest, yes, there is common sense in your words.

Precisely the confusion is there. We confuse omnivorous in the sense of the observation of the fact and not omnivorous in the sense of the effects.
This site is very technical oriented so I will use the following example:
Our thermal vehicles all use petroleum, either crude or refined, or any mechanic knows that we cannot use petrol instead of diesel oil or vice versa otherwise the engine will malfunction or more at all. He is therefore malnourished. The body is the same thing, you cannot put anything in it without it disturbing its functioning. The difference between an internal combustion engine and a living organism is the complexity which makes it possible to mask (for a certain time) the inadequate fuel. But sooner or later (rather late, moreover) this inadequacy will manifest itself in the form of diseases. Which diseases are only indicators of this defect.
Unfortunately the current form of our medical science is more focused on the disappearance of effects than causes because it is easier to swallow a pill than to question it.
This is called free choice!
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Obamot
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View Obamot » 31/01/11, 10:49

The treatment of "causes" is regularly debated here.

... so fully agree!

Although the choice is no longer entirely free (ie this abomination that is the pompously named "Codex Alimentarius").

For the rest, we can digest animal proteins very well by fermentation. It is very easy to test it yourself! It is mainly seen in the consistency of the stool ... (they should not be fragrant and remain firm without constipation, etc, etc ^^) Obviously it is useless to eat meat more than once a week, and as you know, meat proteins can replace ... But obviously we live in a world "apart" and we have to watch the grain ... Because unfortunately not much is planned in society for " non-carnivores ”...

If the food bowl is too acidic in the duodenum, the assimilation of fats, sugars, and proteins will be incomplete. A decomposition then occurs in the small intestine and in the colon, i.e. "too late" [this is the point that makes some people say that the length of the intestine plays a role, so it's neither totally true nor totally false amha - just a question of good timing - because we can very well verify the fact that someone who does not eat meat but too "acidic" food - especially in people who do little physical exercise - can suffer from the effects of putrefaction digestion!]. The normal fermentation process then switches to an "unfinished" process of putrefaction, which can give constipation, gas, bloating and all kinds of other problems ... up to so-called degenerative diseases ....

But beware! Solving the question of the body's acid / base balance does not solve all the problems! Nor all the mistakes! And as the constitution of the food bowl determines the balance by providing sufficient "bases" ... We can see immediately that one cannot go without the other ... :P
Last edited by Obamot the 31 / 01 / 11, 11: 24, 1 edited once.
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Janic
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View Janic » 31/01/11, 11:23

obamot
For the rest, one can very well digest the animal proteins by fermentation. It is very easy to test it yourself! It is basically seen in the consistency of stool ... Of course it is useless to consume meat more than once a week, and as you know, meat proteins can replace ... But obviously we live in a world "apart" and we must take care ... Because unfortunately not much is expected in society for "non-carnivores" ...

That's right (and luckily if not all the omnis would already be dead). It's the final balance that counts.
Living organisms, and mainly the mammal that we are, function according to this scheme: consumption, transformation, assimilation, evacuation of waste. The final assessment will depend on the relationship between assimilation and disassimilation. To take a concrete example: I can take a sheet of 1x1m and cut out a 0,9m washer, the rest being waste; or on the same sheet cut a 0.6 m washer and the rest will be waste, much more important in the second case.
So the greater the assimilation, the more the waste will be minimum and the more the balance sheet will be accredited to assets or profits.
A "healthy" company will choose the first solution or will end up filing for bankruptcy (death). But what does the current "health" system show us? Huge deficit of money certainly, but above all of true "health" and this health deficit follows (among others) meat consumption.
Now more personally, you were talking about syllogisms on my blog: which ones?
And finally, for earthworms, cited by ... (?) Earlier. 2 halves of earthworms do not form two earthworms living. One part dies and the other rarely survives. [/ Quote]
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