diesel engine microlight pendulum

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oiseautempete
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View oiseautempete » 17/05/10, 17:28

Macro wrote:
Never in my life will a motorcycle engine propel me through the air except by accident

I was reading the praise of the CX500 ... Frankly it made me laugh ... This bike was the testing ground of incredible delirium on the part of the Honda R&D office ... To itself it has cumulated rims like the turbo and various ineffective or even dangerous anti-dive fork system ... Its fabulous acatene transmission, which is durable and clean, was almost in itself the cause of this feeling of "wiggling ass" By the combination of operation of opposing forces and unsprung masses ... I recently tried a BMW flat twin ... Almost new ... The feeling remains for me almost the same (except that the BM when the cylinder head rubs, the wheels are still on the ground : Mrgreen: )

Even a 1.4D PSA engine that is eaten 100% pig fat will be more reliable than the best motorcycle engine ...



You are misinformed:
The Honda CX did not have an anti-diving fork (except perhaps the turbo), but rear shock absorbers with double flexibility (soft for small shocks, hard for large, unconvincing), the Comstar wheels were extremely robust and I know something about it: stopped behind a fully loaded van (downhill so impossible for me to move), the van suddenly backed off for no reason, getting on the front wheel, the van's wheels were almost off, the rocker completely depressed, but the Comstar did not move a bit ... The turbo worked very well on the CX because the supercharging was low, it was also the only motorcycle on which the turbo was very well suited ... and we could very well use it on modern machines with a variable geometry turbo ...
As for the acatene transmission, it does not particularly influence road holding, it is the frame which lacked rigidity on the CX, moreover quote me a motorcycle of the time (the CX was released in 1977) which was really rigid ... what you feel is a "freezing" effect of the suspension when accelerating, very little noticeable on BMWs elsewhere, which have exceptional road holding thanks to a very powerful (in particular the fork), but no negative effect level road holding and I could compare on BMW R1150R and R1200R (ultra rigid motorcycles which do not twist of a hair) as well as on moto Guzzi 1100 California (which has a fairly rigid frame also although of very old design), I also tried the Buell 1200 "SS" and a sportster XL1200R and XR1200: the belt is much more pleasant because no jerk, it is very flexible and pleasant ... the chain: blah ... jerks, noise, dirt everywhere, boring maintenance: vaderetro satanas ...

When motorcycle engines on ULM, the flat twin BMW 1200 is one of the most famous (and has a double ignition) but the Suzuki Bandit 1200 is very good too, but we must avoid small displacements which have no motorbike engine, no more than a car engine, can run at full speed for a very long time, neither does an airplane engine, not even the Rotax 912: 5 minutes at full speed, beyond t ° internal become excessive.
I would absolutely not trust a 1400 HDI engine running on anything other than diesel ... the high pressure injection system is fragile, do not play too much ...
This BMW engine is approved on F-Pxxx, VLA and "experimental" aircraft, as well as on ULM of course, there is a French version built by "Chapelet"
http://www.takeoff-ul.de/index.html
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oiseautempete
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View oiseautempete » 17/05/10, 17:40

Christophe wrote:Here I have my answer (I suspected it was a bit related to the RPM). Thank you André.

Strange does not prevent that Honda which developed the 1st variable distribution on the market VTEC, did not find a technological trick to this problem ...


Indeed André is right, the hydraulic tappets are limited to ~ 7000tr, beyond there are inertial problems ... Besides there have also been problems on certain motorcycles: the Guzzi California for example: a lot of cases seizures of buttons ...
Variable timing Alfa also did this on its 2L in 1985, but this is nothing new: the first mechanical variable timing engine dates from ... 1902 (Mercedes Benz)
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Christophe
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View Christophe » 17/05/10, 18:06

Yes mea culpa, Honda is not the only one nor the first, I just found and put online a document on the variable distribution

One thing is certain: many manufacturers have been interested in it since 2000 (anti pollution standards) ... with more or less success.
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oiseautempete
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View oiseautempete » 17/05/10, 18:08

Andre wrote:3 large manufacturers supply most of the propellers for small planes: Maccauley, Sensenich, Hartzel, then a very small market of wood propeller and carbon fiber located in Europe

(Rotax are limited in the choice of propellers)

Their propellers on Piper super cub most of them are 2,15 in diameter (Boreur) a special order at MaCCauley which now is generalized on almost all small seaplanes


Maccauley, Sensenich, Hartzel are almost unknown brands in Europe, in any case for microlights and amateur-built aircraft (fitted only on certain certified aircraft)
On a Rotax and most engines for light aircraft, the propellers must be light (low inertia), otherwise it breaks (reducer, see even crankshaft on the Jabiru), suddenly we mount DUC (carbon), Arplast (carbon) propellers ), ULX (wood), Evra (Wood, notably equips Robin planes), Halter (Wood), Léger (Wood) and I quote only a part of the propellers only made in France ... elsewhere in Europe we find ( non-exhaustive list!): GT (Italy wood), Helix (carbon, Germany), MT (carbon, Germany), Neuform (carbon, Germany), Kievprop (carbon, Ukraine), etc ... (most carbon propellers being not adjustable on the ground) but hardly any American equipment ...
With a 2.15m propeller at 2500r the tip of the blade is not far from the speed of sound: I have known an amateur-built airplane which used a propeller of this kind there used bought in Canada on a conti 100cv from the same origin, but not long, because he received a formal notice from the president of the club who received complaints from neighbors on the ground, under penalty of a flight ban because of the noise if he did not mount a propeller less noisy ... to have heard it, it made almost as much noise as a warbird ... with an Evra propeller of 1.85m it was OK ...
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View Flytox » 17/05/10, 21:30

For long service life of valve clearance without noise and wear.
It is also due to an extremely hard and wear-resistant coating, the Stellite. In addition it is not very expensive or very difficult to industrialize.

http://eric.cabrol.free.fr/Moteur/techno.html

Valves, guides, seals and springs ...

The valve seats are generally covered with stellite (cobalt-chrome-carbon-tungsten) to resist wear. There are sometimes valve rotation devices to allow uniform valve cooling through the seat.
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chatelot16
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View chatelot16 » 17/05/10, 22:32

the valve stellitage is classic in airplane engines but rarer in car engines: I have never even seen one

I read somewhere on an eve doc that the stellitage could not be the best refractory valve steel, it is only done on less refractory steel: the stellitage may not be the best current technique

but I am not sure of anything and I quote this hoping that others will have more precise knowledge ...
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Macro
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View Macro » 18/05/10, 08:31

oiseautempete wrote:
Macro wrote:




You are misinformed:
The Honda CX did not have an anti-diving fork (except perhaps the turbo), but rear shock absorbers with double flexibility (soft for small shocks, hard for large, unconvincing), the Comstar wheels were extremely robust and I know something about it: stopped behind a fully loaded van (downhill so impossible for me to move), the van suddenly backed off for no reason, getting on the front wheel, the van's wheels were almost off, the rocker completely depressed, but the Comstar did not move a bit ... The turbo worked very well on the CX because the supercharging was low, it was also the only motorcycle on which the turbo was very well suited ... and we could very well use it on modern machines with a variable geometry turbo ...
As for the acatene transmission, it does not particularly influence road holding, it is the frame which lacked rigidity on the CX, moreover quote me a motorcycle of the time (the CX was released in 1977) which was really stiff ... what you feel is a "freeze" effect of the suspension on acceleration


http://www.takeoff-ul.de/index.html


I had a cb125 t and a cb 650 equipped with these fabulous comstar ...
The two motorcycles had lived well ... On the 125 no problem..On the 650 ... The crimps of the sticks on the rim we took the game on a trekking outing of 300km..When it happens once you t 'remember it.
Compared to a cx 500 my CB did not have these twists and turns of the dargeot (but my cb had been fitted with quality dampers)
The turbo on motorcycles has always been something reserved for high-flying pilots ... Only good to use on billiards straight ... that's why they abandoned the thing ... Otherwise their customers would all have gone underground ...
For the anti dive..I had read this in moto mag..There was an article on everything that had been done worse on motorcycle (and at the time I was very concerned with a 750 ninja ) ...
It must also be said that I always use last-minute vehicles ... I can't have the same twists as someone who buys a new one ...

Christophe ... The gromonos which exceed 40 km without a complete engine overhaul ... Well, there is not much ... And the honda must be those who get there the least easily ...
When I bought my 500XRR it had 11500km of TT on the odometer the engine had been completely remade on invoice : Mrgreen:
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oiseautempete
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View oiseautempete » 18/05/10, 14:23

Macro wrote:Compared to a cx 500 my CB did not have these twists and turns of the dargeot (but my cb had been fitted with quality dampers)


For riding with a friend's CB 750, I can tell you certify
that it squirmed at least as much, and that it slowed down hardly better ...
My tires were tubeless on the CX: if the crimps of the Comstar had dropped, I don't think they would have remained waterproof : Mrgreen:
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View Other » 20/05/10, 16:44

Hello

Maccauley, Sensenich, Hartzel are almost unknown brands in Europe, in any case for microlights and amateur-built aircraft (fitted only on certain certified aircraft)


Go around the airfield and say month what propeller on the Cessna or Piper cherokée Money, Asteck ect ..
the production figures of MaCCauley or Sensenich alone exceeded all the production of the other small craftsmen, manufacturer put together.
Obviously if we talk about Rotax or Jaribu they are all contraindicated with a light propeller.
I tried on a ULM belt driven Subaru ULM engine, a metal propeller of cessna 140 a 1,78 m in diameter the plane was more recognizable when the performances had increased
compared the small carbon.
The adjustable Warp drive carbon propellers do not last a long time on a Lycoming even on the smallest O-235 115hp.

Andre
precisely one under repair today, a propeller must be larger than the pilot.
2,10 meter propeller
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Capt_Maloche
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View Capt_Maloche » 20/05/10, 22:58

Pretty André Lawn :D
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