The pollution of maritime transport

Transport and new transport: energy, pollution, engine innovations, concept car, hybrid vehicles, prototypes, pollution control, emission standards, tax. not individual transport modes: transport, organization, carsharing or carpooling. Transport without or with less oil.
moinsdewatt
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by moinsdewatt » 28/07/15, 19:09

Christophe wrote:Ah yes as when Costa's ships will fail it will simplify dismantling : Mrgreen: Booom!

ps: sorry ... I go ...


at worst there is the flaring of gas that can be done.
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by Christophe » 28/07/15, 19:26

Yes too! : Mrgreen:
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by Macro » 28/07/15, 19:40

Already eliminate the cruise ships and keep only the useful ones .... they could even turn rough ... and adapt the offer to the needs ... When I see in winter catamarans with more than 400 places equipped with 4 1900hp engines each link fromentine / yeu with 40 passengers aboard ... 7600hp .... For 30mn (if the sea is not bad) it makes liters of diesel for 40 passengers and a few freight containers ...
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by chatelot16 » 29/07/15, 09:52

7600 hp / 400 people = 19 hp / person

It's not much ! much less than any car ... even on days when there are only 40 people it is not that bad ... and even when there is little passenger there is freight

especially that the 4 motors are there to ensure security in bad weather, and that most of the time a reduced power is enough
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Re: Pollution from shipping




by Flytox » 30/12/19, 19:23

https://www.capital.fr/entreprises-marches/transport-maritime-des-carburants-moins-polluants-qui-vont-faire-grimper-les-prix-a-la-pompe-1348988


Maritime transport: less polluting fuels that will drive up prices at the pump

Posted on 03 / 09 / 2019 at 14h30
AFP / Archives / Mark RALSTON

From next January, tens of thousands of ships will have to turn to new, less polluting fuels, a revolution which risks increasing the cost of maritime transport but also pump prices for motorists.
The international maritime organization (IMO) decided in 2016 that the sulfur content of fuel oil should be reduced to 0,5% from January 1, 2020, against 3,5% currently.
Objective: limit the highly toxic emissions of sulfur dioxide produced by the huge fleet of nearly 80.000 ships which ply the seas to transport goods or raw materials.
Maritime transport is indeed on the hot seat: it is responsible for around 400.000 premature deaths and 14 million cases of childhood asthma per year, according to an article published in 2018 in the journal Nature.
Concretely, maritime carriers will have several options. The first is to continue to use the current heavy fuel oil but to equip itself with exhaust gas purifiers ("scubbers").
However, this equipment is expensive and some of it rejects their washing water at sea, which could eventually lead to their ban. "There is uncertainty about the future of the regulations", remarks Nelly Grassin, at Armateurs de France.
The second possibility is to turn to alternative fuels, in particular liquefied natural gas (LNG). However, this choice remains marginal: it is not suitable for all shipping lines because it requires in particular a specific supply infrastructure.
The most obvious option is therefore to adopt fuels that comply with the new regulations: marine fuel oil with very low sulfur content or marine diesel.
Shipping today consumes 3,6 million barrels of oil per day. Of this total, around 600.000 are expected to remain on heavy fuel oil today for ships fitted with scrubbers or which will not immediately comply with the regulations.
"This leaves about 3 million barrels per day which will have to adjust to the new standard of 0,5% sulfur," said Chris Midgley, chief analyst at S&P Global Platts, interviewed by AFP.
- "The general public affected" -
It is therefore a major upheaval for the market. The International Energy Agency (IEA) sees it "easily as the biggest transformation ever seen in the petroleum products market".
The first consequence will be an increase in the cost for the shipowners, who could be tempted to pass on part of the additional cost to their customers - which, at the end of the chain, could increase the price of the goods transported.

Because compliant fuels, more sophisticated and more refined, are "twice as expensive, but we can expect an additional increase with increasing demand", notes Nelly Grassin.
For oil companies, this is a windfall, at least for the time being, because their refining margins will increase. But they will also have to get rid of their heavy fuel oil, the surplus of which can be used, for example, in power plants.
The increased demand for more sophisticated petroleum products will also indirectly affect other fuels, automobiles and air, whose prices are likely to rise.
In fact, refineries that are going to run at full capacity to produce marine diesel will also be thirsty for crude oil with a low sulfur content such as Brent from the North Sea or Texan WTI.
"Brent could climb and approach the $ 70, maybe pass the $ 70 at the end of the year," against less than $ 60 today, believes Chris Midgley. In the end, "IMO regulations will have repercussions on all consumers who buy gasoline or diesel".
For Alan Gelder, an expert at Wood Mackenzie, "the general public will be affected by IMO regulations mainly in two ways: with the cost of air transport and the selling prices of road diesel".
However, knowing that "many airlines cover their kerosene costs many months in advance," "the biggest impact will be on on-road diesel," he said.


2 "Good" news for our biosphere:

The first: The boats will finally use a fuel that is much less sulfur and therefore much less polluting. From there to be generalized : Cry:
The second: It will hurt the price of products that go around the world before arriving home.
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Re: Pollution from shipping




by GuyGadebois » 30/12/19, 19:25

Flytox wrote: The second: It will hurt the price of products that go around the world before arriving home.

So much the better, the more expensive the shit (JP, if you look at me ...), the less profitable it will be to import it.
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Re: Pollution from shipping




by moinsdewatt » 01/01/20, 11:17

Cruise ships will become less polluting
International Maritime Organization regulations provide for a new cap on sulfur emissions from ships.


By Hélène de Lacoste January 1, 2020 leparisien

The “Costa Smeralda” set an example. This first cruise ship powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG), energy considered clean because it does not release sulfur into the atmosphere, embarked its first passengers in Marseille on Sunday, December 29.

It's the trend.
New legislation from the International Maritime Organization provides for a cap on sulfur oxide emissions for ships from 2020, set at 0,5%, compared to 3,5% previously.
This new threshold targets, among other things, huge cruise ships, singled out for their high sulfur emissions. A study by the NGO Transport and environment revealed that in 2017, the hundred cruise ships belonging to the Carnival Corporation group emitted ten times more sulfur oxide in European exclusive economic zones than the 260 million vehicles of the European car fleet!

A greenhouse gas, sulfur gas contributes to the acidification of the atmosphere, just as it affects the health of local residents. "It is a gas which can cause headaches, respiratory problems, and which is at the base of the increase in the mortality rate for people who have respiratory weaknesses", explains Antidia Citores, spokesperson for The NGO Surfrider Foundation Europe. A challenge for energy companies According to the NGO, different means can be used by shipowners to adapt to this new standard.
One of the simplest solutions is to "change the type of fuel, choosing one at 0,5% rather than 3,5% sulfur". But supplying this less sulfur-laden fuel oil to all ships from 1 January is still a challenge for energy companies. Another possible way is "to set up a device which filters the fumes and thus reduces the rate of sulfur emitted", always according to the NGO Surfrider ...

Read the rest of the article on LeParisien.fr


https://www.boursorama.com/actualite-ec ... 14e7f31035
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Re: Pollution from shipping




by moinsdewatt » 17/06/20, 21:09

The “Costa Smeralda” refueled with LNG in Marseille, a first

Posted on 14 / 05 / 2020 lemarin

This first LNG refueling of a ship from a ship in France was carried out discreetly during the night of May 4 to 5.

Image

The '' Coral Methane '' paired with the '' Costa Smeralda '' in Marseille. (Photo: GPMM)


https://lemarin.ouest-france.fr/secteur ... e-premiere
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Re: Pollution from shipping




by moinsdewatt » 17/06/20, 21:10

First transatlantic for an LNG car carrier

lemarin on 17/06/2020

The first of the two new vessels from Siem left Emden on June 16 for North America, loaded with Volkswagen.

Image

The "Siem Confucius" left Emden on June 16 for North America. (photo: DR)

https://lemarin.ouest-france.fr/secteur ... ier-au-gnl
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Re: Pollution from shipping




by Christophe » 17/06/20, 21:50

Strange hull shape ... is it to convert it to a helicopter or aircraft carrier? : Mrgreen:

I didn't even know that we had invented this new type of "car carrier" boat : Shock:

Long live globalization! And when he returns he will bring us H2 or H3?

Ah but all is well, it is in vogue with gas !! 8) 8) 8)
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