What the BRF tree or evergreen?

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SixK
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by SixK » 12/08/21, 12:40

FYI, I planted potatoes and tomatoes where there have been thuja trees for over 30 years.
I just enriched with a handful of potting soil and some rabbit litter.

Despite the totally crappy weather and the lack of maintenance, it's not that bad
For the potatoes I did not have an exceptional yield, but correct.
I had to do 2/3 Kg (I did not weigh) for about 10 feet without really working the clay soil (potatoes placed on the hard and compact soil barely dug before, then covered with 4/5 cm of soil above and on the sides)
Tomatoes also grow quite well. a few diseased feet but planted already diseased.
The cherry tomatoes may have more trouble, but less well exposed, the harvest will be later I think.
I have beautiful bunches of ondine tomatoes.

I have other tomatoes in the vegetable patch, they all caught the mildew, it won't do much.
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by izentrop » 12/08/21, 13:02

humus wrote:Can mowing activate the degradation of cypress / tjuyas cochoncetes and give a magnificent soil that can be used for sowing or even simply to aggregate the soil?
To avoid nitrogen hunger, it will take a lot to compensate for the C / N. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rapport_C ... organiques

The shredded wood mobilizes nitrogen from the soil, hence the herbicidal effect which can be sought by incorporating it into the first few cms of the soil https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bois_ram% ... im_d'azote. I do this in the fall.

I have a dry toilet with separation. Storing urine in an airtight container makes it sterile from any pathogens after a few months. https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/han ... 59_fre.pdf
The urine is incorporated when the soil is warmed up, a week before sowing or planting and I am happy with the results. It can also be diluted with watering http://www.ecosanres.org/pdf_files/ESR- ... omique.pdf

It is enough to store the mashed tuya, or on the aisles (dixit Ahmed) and terpenes are no longer a problem.
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by Ahmed » 12/08/21, 16:41

Without having experienced it, I however presume that a correct composting (therefore with a rise in temperature) will overcome the "cochoncetés" contained in the ground thuja and give a usable product (with care) ... C ' is one of the rare cases where heap composting seems legitimate to me.
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by humus » 12/08/21, 17:22

I'm going to try the experiment with mowing, in lasagna, we'll see what happens.
Yes, the heat of the composting and the rains (?) Should overcome the gilts.
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by Did67 » 13/08/21, 09:49

The mowing provides nitrogen which is lacking in the shredded material. If we sold them, we would pompously call it a composting "activator".

After all, it's all about time!

We tend to neglect this parameter and want recipes in "3 months" ...

I put, despite everything you can read on the internet, my neighbor's walnut leaves to "mulch" my raspberries. Originally, these were installed on a meadow, in the fall, according to the following "itinerary":
a) mow very close, leave in place
b) spread a layer of fairly thick walnut leaves (about 15 cm)
c) with a spade, make a slit by oscillating the handle from front to back; plant the sucker in there; a kick on each side to close the slit ...
d) stretch an anti-bird net (so that the leaves do not fly away; autumn = winds!) [we can remove it in the spring, when the raspberries will grow, because the leaves will be stuck by the fungi)
e) let it grow!

Walnut leaves actually have a "delay" in ignition compared to tender leaves or hay ... But after a year, no "noticeable" difference; a slight nitrogen hunger (pale green leaves, but not determining for a fruit!).
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by humus » 14/08/21, 12:12

I started the cypress compost with the mowing available yesterday.
There are 5 layers of cypress mulch then 5 layers of lawn mowing
Estimated, the thickness of each layer is about 4 to 5 cm of crushed cypress and 4 to 5 cm of fresh mowing.
I'm out of mowing, so I'm quitting for now.
I wait for the next mowing to consume the pile of cypress mulch on the right which had already started to compost on its own in places.
The crushed cypress contains a lot of green which turns brown with the heating of the composting.
There is little wood in the end.

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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by Froggy67 » 14/09/21, 15:21

Hello
I am relaunching the debate a bit.
Because this story of thuja reminds me of the prohibitions on putting citrus fruits in compost.
For those who can and want to, give it a try!
I put 100% cedar mash last fall on one plank, and more classic mash on another plank.
Same culture on these 2 boards this year, and a miracle ;-)! no noticeable difference!
I'm not an agronomist, but this story of soil acidification seems to me more of an urban legend.
And all the more curious to rarely read advice for people who would like to acidify their soils to wait for conifer or other walnut leaves.
Our dear Did will probably be able to light our lantern, but the pH of a soil is done over a very long time and beyond our lives, and must depend for a significant part on the bedrock, right?
Good day....
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by humus » 14/09/21, 16:59

Froggy67 wrote:Hello
I am relaunching the debate a bit.
Because this story of thuja reminds me of the prohibitions on putting citrus fruits in compost.
For those who can and want to, give it a try!
I put 100% cedar mash last fall on one plank, and more classic mash on another plank.
Same culture on these 2 boards this year, and a miracle ;-)! no noticeable difference!
I'm not an agronomist, but this story of soil acidification seems to me more of an urban legend.
And all the more curious to rarely read advice for people who would like to acidify their soils to wait for conifer or other walnut leaves.
Our dear Did will probably be able to light our lantern, but the pH of a soil is done over a very long time and beyond our lives, and must depend for a significant part on the bedrock, right?
Good day....

I don't know much about it, but I think it all depends on the thickness of the ground material and the soil below, which must more or less balance the PH.
I made bins with 30 cm of shredded material before the soil, the growth is found to be extremely slow (close to zero) there there is a majority of coniferous shredded yet semi-composted. And this despite a little gardening soil at the foot of the plants.
In the tanks where there is hardwood shredded, everything is fine except for a small lack of nitrogen.

I think it's the dose of conifer that makes the poison : Wink:
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