What the BRF tree or evergreen?

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Christophe
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by Christophe » 09/10/16, 23:35

Ahmed wrote:Christophe, you did not specify the kind of "fir" ... (it looks like, in view of the photo, spruce ...).


Yes I also look for spruce!
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by Ahmed » 08/03/18, 19:21

A use of coniferous mulch as cellulosic material in dry toilets is conceivable. The ground material must first be dried to properly absorb the liquid fraction. The retention capacity of urine by needles must not be transcendent, but the stem shavings are effective and the smell of resin is nice ...
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by SixK » 13/03/18, 10:39

Pipe branches work pretty well for me on camellia, magnoliat and strawberry plants. And I think that it should be avoided on franboisiers, I had the impression that it weakened them. Stored in a heap, it ends up making a good, probably acidic soil, but the decomposition remains slow. Last point, it can make a good mushroom, but you have to know about mushrooms.

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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by mirroro75 » 09/06/21, 08:14

Hello everybody,

Softwood chips or brf is a great mulch for ornamental shrubs like camellias, magnolia, rhododendron...

A+ :D
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by Ahmed » 09/06/21, 12:46

Small semantic clarification, when it comes to crushed conifers, we are not talking about BRF strictly speaking, we can only do it by a somewhat approximate shortcut. That does not detract from its interest in certain applications or in mixture (in small proportion) with "real" BRF.
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by GuyGadeboisTheBack » 09/06/21, 12:51

Softwoods are to be avoided because of their specific lignin (10 to 20% are however tolerated as a mixture). The resin does not have an aggressive character because it consists of derivatives of diterpenes (rosin part) and monoterpenes (turpentine part). It should be noted that only the genera Pinus, Picea, Larix and Pseudotsuga have resin channels. Cedars are characterized by constituents of heartwood toxic to microorganisms, derived from tropolones (thujaplicins) with a phenolic character, and are therefore prohibited in the BRF.

The acidification of soils by BRF is sometimes feared by some but it is an effect that has never been observed. On the contrary, in acidic soils, the deciduous BRF all have more or less tendency to increase the pH.

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bois_ram% ... ment%C3%A9
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by Ahmed » 09/06/21, 13:00

When I have to grind thuja *, I use it to make an alleyway under the pines, behind my house: it smells good and it is very pleasant to walk on it.

* What happens to me when I eliminate one of these hedges, very popular a few decades ago and made of this plant.
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by humus » 10/08/21, 09:35

Has anyone tried to make compost where something grows in it, with BRF of cedar or cypress + mowing, in lasagna as recommended in this video?
Lasagna in which ash must be added to deacidify.

Personally I used cypress BRF pure, almost composted + commercial compost, for a vegetable patch.
My 18 day radishes are rather 18 weeks old and still not getting bigger. We can not say that it is a lack of water this year.
This semi-composted cypress BRF seems to me more herbicide than good for making compost but I did not add mowing or ash at the time.

In your opinion and feedback.

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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by Did67 » 11/08/21, 12:30

GuyGadeboisLeRetour wrote:
Softwoods are to be avoided because of their specific lignin (10 to 20% are however tolerated as a mixture). The resin does not have an aggressive character because it consists of derivatives of diterpenes (rosin part) and monoterpenes (turpentine part). It should be noted that only the genera Pinus, Picea, Larix and Pseudotsuga have resin channels. Cedars are characterized by constituents of heartwood toxic to microorganisms, derived from tropolones (thujaplicins) with a phenolic character, and are therefore prohibited in the BRF.

The acidification of soils by BRF is sometimes feared by some but it is an effect that has never been observed. On the contrary, in acidic soils, the deciduous BRF all have more or less tendency to increase the pH.

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bois_ram% ... ment%C3%A9


Yes, I think that sums it up well.

It is certain terpene derivatives that pose a problem (except, as Ahmed writes, if it is a question of making a comfortable aisle). Remember that these terpenes, turpentines, etc. are the basis of certain "cough" (or anti-throat irritation) sweets.

But in the long term, certain specific organisms get the better of everything: bark, thuja, cypress, etc ...

It also remains that we call "BRF" a bit of anything and between the one who crushes branches with a lot of needles, and the one who crushes "bare" branches, the result will not be the same.
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Re: What to do with the BRF of fir or conifer?




by humus » 12/08/21, 11:55

Did67 wrote:
GuyGadeboisLeRetour wrote:
Softwoods are to be avoided because of their specific lignin (10 to 20% are however tolerated as a mixture). The resin does not have an aggressive character because it consists of derivatives of diterpenes (rosin part) and monoterpenes (turpentine part). It should be noted that only the genera Pinus, Picea, Larix and Pseudotsuga have resin channels. Cedars are characterized by constituents of heartwood toxic to microorganisms, derived from tropolones (thujaplicins) with a phenolic character, and are therefore prohibited in the BRF.

The acidification of soils by BRF is sometimes feared by some but it is an effect that has never been observed. On the contrary, in acidic soils, the deciduous BRF all have more or less tendency to increase the pH.

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bois_ram% ... ment%C3%A9


Yes, I think that sums it up well.

It is certain terpene derivatives that pose a problem (except, as Ahmed writes, if it is a question of making a comfortable aisle). Remember that these terpenes, turpentines, etc. are the basis of certain "cough" (or anti-throat irritation) sweets.

But in the long term, certain specific organisms get the better of everything: bark, thuja, cypress, etc ...

It also remains that we call "BRF" a bit of anything and between the one who crushes branches with a lot of needles, and the one who crushes "bare" branches, the result will not be the same.


In the video the guy says that a layer of cypress / tjuya mulch, then a layer of mowing + ash (which I don't have) and so on can make compost.
Can mowing activate the degradation of cypress / tjuyas cochoncetes and give a magnificent soil that can be used for sowing or even simply to aggregate the soil?

Anyway I want to try the experiment to make something of this crushed cypress (apart from the alleys) but if this soil is in advance doomed to failure, I am already less inclined to invest in it. work.
I am ready to wait several years -1,2 or 3 but not more, so that this potting soil / compost is usable.
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