Pumping water from the river

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vendelinus
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Re: Pump water from the river




by vendelinus » 22/11/17, 12:05

bardal wrote:There are several solutions to solve your problem, if the level of the river is not too low compared to your garden:

- drawing water from a river to water your garden (or any other use) is not entirely legal; it is even completely prohibited by the law on water; but for very sporadic and very moderate use, it is often tolerated ... In this case, a vulgar 12 V pump (as shown above), connected to a strainer-valve pipe going to the river, will suffice to your needs; it's easy to set up, simple to set up and store, and not too expensive; it can - very simply - be powered by the battery of your automobile (2 hours of pumping = less than a quarter of the capacity of your battery), or by a photovoltaic panel of around one hundred Watts (but suddenly, this 'is limited to sunny days, and it's much less easy to move). If the thing seems too complicated, or too "mechanical", a simple hand pump will do the same job at the cost of a lot of elbow grease ...

- a well or a borehole will find the water at approximately the level of the river. A "borehole" peak is within the reach of an amateur (it is a steel pipe pierced with holes and provided with a point), and will receive either a hand pump or an electric pump. A drilled well is possible to dig by an amateur if the water is not deep (2 or 3 meters), but if you prefer, two hours of backhoe loader will not cost you a fortune; a well allows a pump (electric or manual) and a bucket, and it has an indefinable charm ... But it's more work ...

We stay there in not too expensive solutions and within the reach of a brave amateur ...


Do you think I could connect a hand pump directly to the river using a hose? It would be pretty ideal, I think.
I don't know much about the connections of the arm pumps (the old cast iron models), but if I could connect them directly to the river, it would be great.
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Ahmed
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Re: Pump water from the river




by Ahmed » 22/11/17, 12:45

In principle, plugging directly into the river poses no technical problem. The energy expenditure at the pump is a function of the difference in height (knowing that there is a maximum of approximately 7 M) and of the pressure losses which vary according to the length of the suction pipe and its diameter ...
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vendelinus
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Re: Pump water from the river




by vendelinus » 22/11/17, 14:57

Ahmed wrote:In principle, plugging directly into the river poses no technical problem. The energy expenditure at the pump is a function of the difference in height (knowing that there is a maximum of approximately 7 M) and of the pressure losses which vary according to the length of the suction pipe and its diameter ...


So in my case, with 1 drop of about 1 meter, whether the pipe is 2 meters or 5 meters, the force to be actuated at the pump will be the same? You confirm.

Thank you very much.
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Ahmed
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Re: Pump water from the river




by Ahmed » 22/11/17, 15:06

In practice, there will be no appreciable difference and, for these values, the effort to be produced will be very reasonable.
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Re: Pump water from the river




by olivier75 » 22/11/17, 17:23

Hello,

To water it is better to use water at room temperature.
I will recommend a reserve with tap and a beast pump for drill, used with a screwdriver blocked with a tape or a Rilsan the time to drain the batteries while you garden, which is more than enough for some watering cans.
But above all cover the ground, of course hay if possible, to do without watering as much as possible.

Olivier.
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vendelinus
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Re: Pump water from the river




by vendelinus » 22/11/17, 17:49

olivier75 wrote:Hello,

To water it is better to use water at room temperature.
I will recommend a reserve with tap and a beast pump for drill, used with a screwdriver blocked with a tape or a Rilsan the time to drain the batteries while you garden, which is more than enough for some watering cans.
But above all cover the ground, of course hay if possible, to do without watering as much as possible.

Olivier.


Hello,

I don't quite understand the system with the screwdriver. And I admit that I don't really understand what a drill pump is.

The goal is to pump with a screwdriver?
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olivier75
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Re: Pump water from the river




by olivier75 » 22/11/17, 20:29

Hi,

Of this type, 1500l / h, which should be more than enough for 10mn / 45mn of autonomy depending on the screwdriver.

http://www.conrad.fr/ce/fr/product/8131 ... mxEALw_wcB

olive
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Re: Pump water from the river




by sicetaitsimple » 22/11/17, 20:49

vendelinus wrote:
sicetaitsimple wrote:
No personal experience. If you type "drilling price" on your search engine, you will find indications of 50 € to 100 € to the meter, but I suppose that there is a "minimum price" of the operation linked to the fixed costs of supply of the machine etc ... even if the drilling is ultimately only 3 or 4m.


I asked a company, it's between 1000 and 3000 euros ...


You may need to expand your search, explaining your case well (river border).

But of course if you find a solution of direct pumping in the river it will be less expensive, except that it can lead you to have to "tinker", installation of the pump, of the pipe, connection to a battery, then folding of everything that every time you want to water .... Which may quickly become ch..nt.
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vendelinus
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Re: Pump water from the river




by vendelinus » 22/11/17, 22:40

olivier75 wrote:Hi,

Of this type, 1500l / h, which should be more than enough for 10mn / 45mn of autonomy depending on the screwdriver.

http://www.conrad.fr/ce/fr/product/8131 ... mxEALw_wcB

olive


You can explain the principle to me, I don't see ...
I'm sorry for being painful ...

Edit: I just watched some video, it looks very good, but it must be super noisy, right?
And does it work with all drills? Or you need a minimum of power or revolutions / minute
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Re: Pump water from the river




by cortejuan » 23/11/17, 00:19

Hello,

When you are near a river, you can use part of the water provided you return it after use ...

So basically I recommend not connecting a catchment directly in the river. If it is removable, no problem, if it is permanent, it is a source of problem. I had the visit of a guard who was desperately looking for the pipe (nonexistent) which has his eyes feeding my pond.

The right solution is drilling a shallow well, it's not a big job. There are commercially available nozzles for forming the walls of the well.

In conclusion, there should be no direct link between the river and your watering hole ...

See you
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