Bushy plant fast growing against overlooked?

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Christophe
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by Christophe » 31/07/15, 11:55

Ok I will inquire, thank you didi!
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Rabbit
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by Rabbit » 31/07/15, 12:58

Christophe wrote:Hold on as I think about it: I would also like to stump ... the stump (of fir) that we see on this image (there is a block on it):

Image

Anyone know an "economical" and not too tiring method ???


You make holes in the stump with a drill. You fill with potassium nitrate (NITRATE DE POTASSE, Fontaine Beauvois offers some) then you fill up. After is more than waiting.
Either you set it on fire, or you may be harvesting mushrooms if you're lucky. In any case, you should be able to uproot the strain next summer or the following fall.
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by arnangu » 31/07/15, 21:29

Did67 wrote:Try the "false acacia" (locust). It is a "leguminous" tree, which plays a pioneering role in the reconquest of lands that have become uncultivated in our climates ...



and then !!! this is a tree filth !!!! as proof we pruned a dozen in the field that had never been maintained and this year with the heat wave (do not forget that the real acacia is African) we have shoots everywhere in the field !!!!! a real plague these locust trees ... we found new plants every day.

we will wait until this winter and as soon as our "loving" earth (clay) becomes more flexible, we dig up all that. in short, I strongly advise against it because not only does it lose its leaves so in winter the opposite returns, you cannot get under the trees, because a very sticky form of resin falls. Apart from loving the acacia flower fritters, and there we can not fight ....

do not forget that this tree is classified among the invasive plants and difficult to control.

If the earth is so bad why not amend it?
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by 1360 » 01/08/15, 07:15

Christophe wrote:for the garlic method, I still have a doubt ... : Mrgreen:


Well, garlic scares vampires well, so why wouldn't it make the stumps disappear? (if not, there is David Copperfield who is strong to make disappear things).


Have you thought about planting a weeping willow tree to block the view? It grows "quickly" if the land has enough water ... and it's beautiful.

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by Leo Maximus » 01/08/15, 19:00

Christophe wrote:... the tree I just cut down was doing pretty well ...

Softwoods, in general, are not very difficult to extract.

In the past 15 days I have uprooted 26 cypresses. The largest were 50cm in circumference.

Image

I first dug a small trench around the edge that I filled with water several times in the previous days to soften the soil.

I then attacked with a pickaxe from Casto :(http://www.castorama.fr/store/Pioche-ha ... 30074.html).

It is the ideal tool, essential AMHA, for stopping. We dig with the pickaxe and as soon as we find a root we turn the tool and attack with an ax. The difficulty is, possibly, the presence of stones.

It still takes one to two hours (with breaks :D ) by strain.
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Re: Bushy fast growing plant against opposite?




by Christophe » 15/10/16, 11:27

Finally I did not plant anything and I let nature do it:

a) a hornbeam (or beech) arrived naturally at the "right place" as well as a fir tree, visible at the foot of the hazel tree (I am quite astonished by the growth of the small hardwood in 1 year ... must be enjoyed here!)

b) an elder tree also grew back (there was already time of the fir tree) next to the stump: it simply lacks a little height, maybe for next year?

c) then this spring I removed all the fences, it made more "open" ... then I mowed a "little" anyway ...

DSC05871.JPG

DSC05870.JPG
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Re: Bushy fast growing plant against opposite?




by Christophe » 29/01/22, 02:38

I just came across this subject…I'll take some pictures for you 6 years later (already!)..this weekend if the weather isn't too bad…

The beech is 3 m, the hazel in the 4 m…

I did well to plant nothing that goes up high and quickly since I put the pv in 2019...

ps: we were already talking about the robinia…suddenly an old biker than ever…since I have just planted about thirty of them : Cheesy: : Arrow: gardening / fast-growing-plant-in-a-garden-to-have-the-equivalent-of-0-5-a-1-stere-of-wood-per-year-t17079.html
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Re: Bushy fast growing plant against opposite?




by Rajqawee » 31/01/22, 09:09

Christophe wrote:I just came across this subject…I'll take some pictures for you 6 years later (already!)..this weekend if the weather isn't too bad…

The beech is 3 m, the hazel in the 4 m…

I did well to plant nothing that goes up high and quickly since I put the pv in 2019...

ps: we were already talking about the robinia…suddenly an old biker than ever…since I have just planted about thirty of them : Cheesy: : Arrow: gardening / fast-growing-plant-in-a-garden-to-have-the-equivalent-of-0-5-a-1-stere-of-wood-per-year-t17079.html


Regarding the management of the opposite, I thought about it a little:

-option 1: bamboo. There are varieties that do NOT ryzhom, usually rather small in size, like 2m. For the varieties which rhyzoment, it is thus necessary to contain them in a "bin" if one does not want that that overflows. The best option for this is probably corrugated iron in the ground to form a trough. Depending on the variety of bamboo, it can still lead to a p*$@!! of trench to make, since it depends on the depth of "travel" of the rhizome, which can range from 50cm to 1m. For varieties that do not ryzhoment, it grows in 1 year in a determined way. the same goes for the cannes de provence. Another function: it makes great tutors.
-option 2: tall grasses (for example see https://amenager-son-jardin.com/gramine ... es-jardin/). It is also determined, so we easily control the growth and save pruning. And it reaches its maximum size in a year.
-option 3: "vines", such as vines, kiwis, star jasmine, jasmine, passionflower and so on. They need support, it's true, but they grow very quickly. and on a fairly manageable surface. On the other hand, many are obsolete and therefore lose the screen function X months per year.
-option 4: bushy shrubs, such as christopher hazel, certain varieties of willow...
-option 5 (yes!): the "too bad" option, there is an opposite and I get used to it.

Personally, I use a mix of all that to manage the 60 linear meters in common with my neighbors (which in the end I hardly ever see, so option 5 is widely used)
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Re: Bushy fast growing plant against opposite?




by Christophe » 31/01/22, 09:42

Thank you Raj for these new options (we can mix them all finally...)

But as I said above, in the end I did (almost) nothing and I let nature take its course: a beautiful elderberry grew (it has been mature for 2 years I think: it no longer grows tall ) and a beech or hornbeam has appeared...I'm going to try to prune it so that it grows horizontally and that it makes a sort of entrance arch 8)

Here are 2 photos taken just now... it's winter, you can't see much but it allows you to compare the evolution with the photos above from a few years ago...

20220131_092821.jpg


From left to right: red hazel, beech/hornbeam, elderberry, rickety knotweed, green hazel and forsythia

20220131_092800.jpg
20220131_092800.jpg (385.58 KB) Viewed times 2017


If I had planted a 2nd hazel tree instead of the knotweed it would have been all good...in summer at least! : Lol:
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Re: Bushy fast growing plant against opposite?




by Christophe » 31/01/22, 09:44

To be compared to summer 2015:

Image
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