3D printer and health ... A marvelous technological breakthrough, but beware of the risks!

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Re: 3D printer and health ... A marvelous technological advance, but beware of the risks!




by Flytox » 15/09/20, 10:17

Christophe wrote:Indeed it is not a "perfect" cube I had put a few passes of smooth (smoothing) during the modeling. The angles are therefore not sharp and the walls slightly concave (or convex it depends on how you look :D ) ... Well a photo is worth a thousand words ... the bottom is at the bottom.

Part printed in 90 mm / s and layers of 0.25 mm.

cube.jpg

The convexity of the vertical walls is much more marked in real life than on the computer model. We also notice an asymmetry: it is more marked on the left than on the right.

The computer model, even smoothed, was indeed 80x80x80

Also notice all these m ** hair, especially on the horizontal walls (and I have already deleted the biggest ...) .. The PETG is really a pain to print (or it's my spool which is crap ?? It's amazon basics ...) I think that this will be my 1st and last PETG reel ... I nevertheless followed the tutorials and advice that can be found on the net about PETG. Maybe I am printing a little too fast? The maximum capacity of the machine is 120 mm / s. Not a big deal, the room is functional, ugly but functional! : Cheesy:



In metallic 3D printing, the "deposit" speed is rarely at its maximum to limit the problems of surface condition, metallurgical problems and deformations.

To prevent the part "collapsing" under its own weight, they print at the same time as the part, "reinforcements" at strategic points.
These reinforcements are printed with weak spots so that they are easy to remove / break without adding too much finishing. These reinforcements often have the shape of a somewhat tight "grid" in particular to save material. (I have no photos : Cry: )

The deformations (puff dimension of several mm) can come from the Numerical Control in particular when it is controlled in open loop.
If there is a hard point for example on an axis, the dimension is not reached without telling the NC ....... which continues as if nothing had happened.
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Re: 3D printer and health ... A marvelous technological advance, but beware of the risks!




by Christophe » 15/09/20, 10:55

Yes I know the "bridges" well ...

Some parts (plastic but I imagine metal too) do not require it ... It depends mainly on their shape (need to model taking into account the manufacturing means), the capabilities of the printer, the type of material and ... the final state of the part you want and the time you want to spend on printing. In FDM, bridges can represent more than 50% of the printing time (already long ...)!

I could have actually put bridges that would have improved the surface finish of the horizontal parts and certainly limited the deformation. But this part, a pure proto for almost single use for a few tests, did not require an extraordinary quality of finish.

In SLA the bridges only consume more material but do not waste time ... I am not familiar with metal printing but I think it's the same as SLA.
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Re: 3D printer and health ... A marvelous technological advance, but beware of the risks!




by thibr » 15/09/20, 18:42

Flytox wrote:...
To prevent the part "collapsing" under its own weight, they print at the same time as the part, "reinforcements" at strategic points.
These reinforcements are printed with weak spots so that they are easy to remove / break without adding too much finishing. These reinforcements often have the shape of a somewhat tight "grid" in particular to save material. (I have no photos : Cry: )
...

or not : Wink:
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Re: 3D printer and health ... A marvelous technological advance, but beware of the risks!




by Petrus » 24/09/20, 00:22

It is possible to make the printed parts in PETG hermetic and more resistant by annealing them in salt (the salt is just used to hold the part during the cooking), very interesting:
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Re: 3D printer and health ... A marvelous technological advance, but beware of the risks!




by Adrien (ex-nico239) » 24/09/20, 00:39

Have a question ...

I spent a lot of time ...
Creality ok
Ariane plast - one coil ok, another badly wound, blocking unwinding ... pfff
Chinese - 1 roll of perfect blue, the red and the green trash, they were making corks.

Anyway, I ordered another red Sunlu ... I'm waiting to see

But if you have brands to recommend to me, it would be great.
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Re: 3D printer and health ... A marvelous technological advance, but beware of the risks!




by Christophe » 24/09/20, 08:38

Petrus wrote:It is possible to make the printed parts in PETG hermetic and more resistant by annealing them in salt (the salt is just used to hold the part during the cooking), very interesting:


Excellent I will test quickly, I just printed PETG parts yesterday!
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Re: 3D printer and health ... A marvelous technological advance, but beware of the risks!




by Christophe » 24/09/20, 08:50

Adrien (ex-nico239) wrote:Have a question ...

I spent a lot of time ...

(...)

But if you have brands to recommend to me, it would be great.


It's a good question (it deserves a dedicated topic) apparently the quality of plastics is quite different ... it's a bit like pellets ... the standards less. : Cheesy:

Many advise to go on 3DJack ... not tested.

Sunlu has a PLA + range (a bit like DIN + ah ah ah) ... with, obviously, nothing but praise. I will test on my next purchases ...

I finished a coil of neutral transparent PLA ... which never was. The pieces are whitish, at best very slightly translucent on some layers. Do you have any advice on setting to manage transparency? It wasn't a big deal for the parts I was printing but hey ... it didn't meet expectations ...
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Re: 3D printer and health ... A marvelous technological advance, but beware of the risks!




by Christophe » 24/09/20, 12:28

Petrus wrote:It is possible to make the printed parts in PETG airtight and more resistant by annealing them in salt (the salt is just used to hold the part during the cooking), very interesting


Not having enough table salt, I just launched a test with baking soda (its salt looks very fine ... so it looks more like baking soda in texture than kitchen salt ... ).

240 ° C / 45 min ...

In English we say bicarbonate salt precisely ...
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Re: 3D printer and health ... A marvelous technological advance, but beware of the risks!




by Ahmed » 24/09/20, 13:18

Why not fine sand?
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Re: 3D printer and health ... A marvelous technological advance, but beware of the risks!




by Christophe » 24/09/20, 13:20

Yes he says so in his video comments. It is possible ... But the final surface condition depends entirely on the grain size.

The finest sand is probably less fine than baking soda isn't it?

Well it's done! I will unmold (once it cools!)
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