Uranium reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve

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izentrop
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by izentrop » 03/04/19, 23:27

For the European Commission as for MIT, nuclear will be part of the energy mix against CO 2 emissions. https://paperjam.lu/article/le-nucleair ... aux-jours-
"All the models of the United Nations research institutes call for substantial developments in the nuclear field: according to the sustainable development scenario of the International Energy Agency (IEA), the world will need to produce 17 gigawatts of nuclear energy more per year, which should double current capacity by 2040, "writes the MIT Review. "If the situation remained as it is now, the plan to shut down the production units would reduce electricity production by 240 gigawatts by 2040", which would ruin any hope of limiting CO2 emissions.
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by moinsdewatt » 04/04/19, 08:54

For China too.

China to build 6-8 nuclear reactors a year to meet 2030 development goals: Official

Reuters | Apr 1, 2019,

China will be able to build six to eight nuclear reactors a year if project approval processes return to normal as expected in the near future, the chairman of the state-owned China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) told Reuters on Monday.

“That should be enough to meet our country's 2030 development plans,” Yu Jianfeng said, speaking on the sidelines of an industry conference.

China did not approve any new conventional nuclear projects for three years before giving the nod to two new reactor complexes in southeast China earlier this year.

China originally planned to put 58 gigawatts of nuclear power into operation by 2020, with another 30 GW under construction. Total capacity stood at 46 GW by the end of last year, with 11 GW still being built.

But the slowdown means it is unlikely to meet its 2020 goals, and industry executives have been calling on the state to accelerate the approval process in order to ensure that 2030 energy, climate and pollution targets can be reached.

China aims to raise the share of non-fossil fuels to 20 per cent of its total energy mix by 2030, up from 15 per cent in 2020. It also aims to bring greenhouse gas emissions to a peak by around the end of the next decade .

In a message delivered to the Monday conference, Agneta Rising, director general of the World Nuclear Association, said China needed to "show leadership and announce an accelerated phase of construction".

CNNC's Yu told the conference the global nuclear sector was gradually "recovering confidence" after the 2011 Fukushima disaster in Japan.

However, "communication problems" and "misunderstandings" among the public were one of the reasons why China hasn't been able to take full advantage of its manufacturing capabilities and increase capacity more quickly, he said.

"China's nuclear industry has made big achievements, but there are still a lot of problems, and development is still incomplete and imbalanced," he said, adding that China's total nuclear plants still amount to only 4 per cent of total generation capacity.

China is promoting new advanced reactor technologies and is the first country to complete the construction of third-generation models like Westinghouse's AP1000 and the French EPR design.

Yu also told Reuters that CNNC should be ready to begin construction of a small-scale "modular" nuclear reactor on the island province of Hainan by the end of this year. The project was originally expected to begin construction in 2017.

Last year, Yu said China's total nuclear capacity should reach 120-150 gigawatts (GW) in total by 2030, triple the current level but still lower than previous forecasts.


https://www.dnaindia.com/world/report-c ... al-2735303
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by moinsdewatt » 21/11/20, 14:58

Malawi: Lotus Resources to spend $ 50 million to restart uranium production in Kayelekera

Ecofin Agency 21 oct 2020

In Malawi, Australian Lotus Resources will need $ 50 million to restart production at its Kayelekera uranium mine. This is what reveals an exploratory study published by the mining junior, which wants to take advantage of the supply deficit expected by 2024 to accelerate its plans.

According to an exploratory study published on October 20 by the Australian junior mining company Lotus Resources, the restart of the Kayelekera uranium mine in Malawi will require an investment of $ 50 million. This relatively modest capital cost is justified, we learn, by the presence on the site of most of the necessary infrastructure, including a factory with an annual treatment capacity of 1,4 million tonnes.

It should be noted that the restart plan involves two basic scenarios. In the first, Kayelekera will have a lifespan of 8 years with a production of 16,4 million pounds of uranium. For the second scenario, Lotus is counting on a production of 23,8 million pounds of uranium over 14 years, thanks in particular to the treatment of mining residues from the eighth year of operation.

“The scoping study for the restart clearly demonstrates that Kayelekera could be one of the major operations in the world to resume uranium production to meet the looming and growing supply shortage,” commented Eduard Smirnov, CEO of the company, specifying that a feasibility study will soon be launched to optimize the various estimates.

According to a March 2020 estimate, the Kayelekera mine harbors 37,5 million pounds of uranium oxide. It produced 10,9 million pounds of uranium between 2009 and 2014, before being placed under maintenance by Paladin Energy. Lotus Resources, which acquired the project a few months ago, already has most of the regulatory approvals and has some potential customers of nuclear power plant operators in North America.


https://www.agenceecofin.com/uranium/21 ... kayelekera
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