Uranium reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve

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izentrop
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by izentrop » 05/02/17, 23:25

the sector has suffered greatly from the low raw material prices observed in recent years, prompting Rössing and Langer Heinrich, two major mines in the country, to reduce their production in 2015. Result: Namibia's uranium ore production dropped 20% that year.

Great performances in sight

Despite this context, however, analysts expect an increase in global uranium production, driven by the expected growth in global demand for new reactors. According to a study by the research firm GlobalData, the whole world should produce 76 tonnes by 493, an annual growth of 2020%.

A dynamism in which the Namibian government wants to carve out a good place for itself.

The sector is currently moving with the announcement this week of the first production of the uranium mine of Husab (in the Namib Desert), operated by the China General Nuclear Power Corporation and commissioned in October 2016. Estimating the potential of With its high mine, the Chinese firm intends to produce 15 million tonnes of uranium per year and to make the Husab site among the most efficient in the world. http://afrique.latribune.fr/entreprises ... mibie.html
No crisis in sight and an acceleration looming pending the transition to thorium.
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by dede2002 » 06/02/17, 16:14

... the Chinese want to exploit uranium in Namibia, but France (world nuclear champion) sources its supplies in large part in Niger (compare the tonnages ...?)

Is France preparing to buy Uranium from China? After spending billions to defend its area of ​​influence?

Is Namibia included in the Chinese zone of influence?

The approaches seem different between the various attempts to appropriate the riches of Africa, but the probable outcome seems similar ...
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by moinsdewatt » 09/02/17, 13:24

Uranium in Namibia is a business like any other.


Namibia: in 2017, uranium will boost economic growth

Ecofin Agency December 14, 2016

Namibia's economic growth will be boosted considerably in 2017 by uranium production, which is expected to double following the planned start-up of processing operations at the Husab mine. The information was announced by BMI Research in its latest report released Tuesday.

"Even though economic growth forecasts were revised downwards in 2016 from 3,8% to 1,5% due to strong contractions in the construction, mining and agriculture sectors in the first half, we however, expect strong growth of 4,5% in 2017, "said the research group.

The Husab project, a joint venture between China General Nuclear Power Holding Corp and Swakop Uranium, will produce up to 15 million tonnes of uranium, production which will be gradually increased to reach the installed capacity of the processing plant which is 50 million tonnes per year. For 2017, the country expects the mine, which would make it the third largest producer of uranium in the world, to allow it to double its uranium production.

“We expect uranium to become a key driver of Namibian exports over the next few years. We forecast real export growth of 7% in 2017 compared to 2,1% in 2016, ”added BMI.

However, the research group warned in its report that the strong growth announced thanks to the exploitation of uranium should be limited by the high indebtedness of Namibian households.

Namibia is currently the 4 world's largest producer of uranium.

http://www.agenceecofin.com/uranium/141 ... economique
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by Ahmed » 09/02/17, 19:05

However, the research group warned in its report that the strong growth announced thanks to the exploitation of uranium should be limited by the high indebtedness of Namibian households.

It is an "economist's view", in the sense that we speak of an "artist's view"! The reality is that the earnings of mining rent will mainly increase inequalities in this country ...
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by moinsdewatt » 04/01/18, 18:09

Uranium: mining groups drastically reduce their production

By Claire Fages RFI December 6, 2017

Faced with the overproduction of uranium that has taken place since the Fukushima disaster, mining groups are reducing their activity. Latest, Kazatomprom, the Kazakh supplier, world number one.

Kazatomprom, the Kazakh giant of uranium, will reduce its mining production by 20% over three years. 11 tonnes of uranium oxide will be withdrawn from the market by 000. Including 2020 tonnes next year: this represents 4% of global mining production.

We did not expect such a sacrifice from the Kazakh group: it has the lowest production costs in the world, which has allowed it to quintuple its production in 10 years. But uranium prices are so low that the world leader is forced to imitate its competitors.

From Kazakhstan to Niger

In early November, the Canadian number two Cameco decided to suspend the activity of its giant McArthur River mine, which produces 6 tonnes of uranium per year. 000 employees will be unemployed in 800. The French Areva, world number three, moreover a shareholder with more than 2018% of this Canadian mine, had preceded the movement, announcing, in October, the elimination of 30 direct jobs at the Somaïr, one of its subsidiaries in Niger, to reduce its production by 200 tonnes in this country (minus 800%).

Growing demand but too much fuel stocks

It is for mining groups to reduce the global uranium surplus that drives prices down. Throughout 2017, the pound of uranium oxide did not take off from 18 to 20 dollars. It was worth more than $ 135 in 2007 and another $ 40 in March 2011, just before the Fukushima disaster.

Since then, even if the demand increases regularly, the restart of the Japanese reactors is long overdue. Suddenly the overabundance of unused uranium keeps prices very low on the spot uranium market, outside of long-term contracts: there is too much mining production as secondary production, recycled or of military origin. In fact, the United States Department of Energy gave up last spring on selling part of its reserves so as not to further encumber the market. In addition, there are the stocks held by the operators of the power stations themselves.

By reducing the airfoil, the mining groups therefore hope for a small electric shock on the uranium market, but not a surge in prices.

http://www.rfi.fr/emission/20171206-ura ... production
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by moinsdewatt » 18/11/18, 22:01

The world's number one in uranium, Kazatomprom, soon to be listed in London

AFP 31 Oct 2018

The world's leading producer of uranium, the Kazakh public group Kazatomprom, announced its next IPO in London on Wednesday for a valuation of up to $ 4 billion.

This project, unveiled at the end of October, is symbolic after gloomy years for nuclear since the Fukushima disaster in 2011, pushing many countries to turn away from the atom or reduce their ambitions.

The listing of a uranium producer, which requires transparency and exposure, is also rare in this secret sector, dominated by groups backed by states. In a press release Wednesday, Kazatomprom announced that it had offered a price between 11,6 and 15,4 dollars per security to investors, which gives it hope of a valuation of between 3 and 4 billion dollars.

The company will put 15% of its capital on the stock market, which will be sold by the Kazakh sovereign fund Samruk-Kazyna, with the aim of starting the listing in London on November 13. "We were encouraged by the initial reactions of institutional investors around the world to our IPO proposal," said Galymzhan Pirmatov, CEO of the group, in the statement.

The company indicates, based on the consultancy firm UxC, to hold a market share in 2017 of 19,4% in world uranium production, ahead of the French Orano (ex-Areva), the Canadian Cameco and the Russo -Canadian Uranium One.

Uranium prices have rebounded strongly in recent months as a result of lower production. According to futures contracts listed in New York, they now move to 28 dollars per pound, against 20 in April, but far from the 70 dollars exceeded in early 2011 before Fukushima.

The initial public offering of Kazatomprom is part of a series of privatizations decided by the President of Kazakhstan Nursultan Nazarbayev. The FT reported on Tuesday that the national oil and gas company KazMunaiGas was finalizing its plan for an initial public offering, which could take place simultaneously in London and on the local market in 2019, according to close sources.

The business daily explains that this company could be valued between 25 and 26 billion dollars, which would make it the largest operation of this type ever recorded in Central Asia.

https://www.connaissancedesenergies.org ... res-181031
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by Exnihiloest » 18/11/18, 22:15

Ahmed wrote:...
It is an "economist's view", in the sense that we speak of an "artist's view"! The reality is that the earnings of mining rent will mainly increase inequalities in this country ...

Raising inequality, and assuming it is, does not mean lowering the lowest income.
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by Ahmed » 18/11/18, 22:34

It simply means that the power of the richest of the poorest is growing and that the functioning of this society is increasingly difficult (how to dialogue when the interests of the various classes diverge more and more?).
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by Bardal » 21/11/18, 19:39

Ahmed wrote:It simply means that the power of the richest of the poorest is growing and that the functioning of this society is increasingly difficult (how to dialogue when the interests of the various classes diverge more and more?).


Bof ... Debate off topic, and without interest; indeed, it is not uranium that will bring justice on earth; but neither is it petroleum nor coal ... Let us situate this debate at the level where it must be situated, that is to say at a political level, and include in it the totality of human activities, by proposing some alternatives to break this deadlock. But it has little to do with the availability of uranium ore, or at least no more to do with any commercial resource ...

Regarding fissile material, it had not escaped anyone (except a few participants of this forum apparently) that uranium reserves were limited and that there were hardly a few decades to exploit them with current technologies; some spoke of 50 years, others of less, and it is even this observation which had led the engineers to explore, with success, moreover, the breeder generation; and also to exploit the thorium sector, which is essentially breeder.

It is at this stage of the debate that we stand today; let's see in terms:


- there remains approximately 50 years of uranium to be mined to cover the current needs with the current techniques (pressurized water-uranium channel, no breeding), known reserves of uranium; it will be noted that by drawing uranium from seawater (it is more expensive, but has practically no impact on the price of the kWh produced), one can multiply the reserves by at least one thousand, without changing anything. otherwise.

- by switching to breeder-generation (and the sodium-plutonium sector is not the only one possible, a molten salt sector is entirely conceivable, and has already been tested), neither 1% of the uranium is burned, but 100%; our 50 years of critical reserves become 5000 years (maybe 4500, or 4000, I do not care)

- by going to the thorium sector (4 times more abundant than uranium), also burned at 100%, it is still a few thousand years saved (no need to count precisely), far more than it does it will take to master the merger; the only stock of thorium owned by France (it is a waste from the exploitation of rare earths) represents about two centuries of consumption for us ... Note, the stock of U238 available is roughly nearly as much (and for both, Th and U, no need for mines in Niger or Namibia).

- even if humanity had to increase very seriously its production, what I wish, the current resources are counted in millennia; even if we multiplied by 50 (which besides does not seem to me useful) ...


Well my poor anti-nuk, you are not done mourning over forums; but take another theme of lamentation, this one is a pierced pipe ... Take, for example, the waste ... My friend Hubert talks about it often. And try to find out from reliable sources ...
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Re: Uranium: reserves and equivalent Hubbert curve




by moinsdewatt » 22/11/18, 08:28

Saudi Arabia is interested in nuclear power plants, that's good it would have Uranium:

Saudi energy minister Khalid al-Falih said on Monday the kingdom had launched a uranium exploration program and initial indications were positive, Al-Arabiya Business reported on Twitter.


Nov 19, 2018 CAIRO (Reuters)

Falih added that a project to construct two nuclear plants, was proceeding at an excellent pace according to plan, according to Al-Arabiya. No further detail was given.

Saudi Arabia has said it wants to build the nuclear power stations with the help of US technology.

Non-proliferation advocates are concerned that any civilian nuclear deal between Riyadh and Washington that could allow the kingdom to enrich uranium and reprocess plutonium could one day be covertly altered to produce fissile material for atom bombs.

Saudi Arabia has said that if it does not get US assistance to build reactors it may turn to other international partners. The kingdom is also in talks with companies from Russia, China, South Korea and other countries on nuclear power.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-saud ... SKCN1NO2E7

For uranium we already knew that the Chinese were going to help with exploration in the country, there would already be 9 areas of interest.
Uranium In March and August 2017 China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) and the Saudi Geological Survey signed agreements on cooperation on the exploration of uranium. CNNC said it would explore nine potential areas for uranium resources in Saudi Arabia over the next two years.

Extract of http://www.world-nuclear.org/informatio ... rabia.aspx

And more precisely in the province of AL Hail

Saudi Arabia plans to explore and mine uranium in the Al Hail province. This is in the core of its ambition to achieve a self-sufficient nuclear program.
..........
Project Details Estimated uranium reserves: 60,000 tonnes of uranium ore. Chinese collaboration. Plan for over 16,000 MW of nuclear power. According to [1], Saudi Arabia plans to extract uranium domestically as part of its nuclear power program and sees this as a step toward “self-sufficiency” in producing atomic fuel. Extracting its own uranium also makes sense from an economic point of view, said Hashim bin Abdullah Yamani, head of the Saudi government agency tasked with the nuclear plans, the King Abdullah City for Atomic and Renewable Energy (KACARE). The Kingdom says it wants to tap atomic power for peaceful purposes only in order to diversify its energy supply, and will award a construction contract for its first two nuclear reactors by the end of 2018. “.
..............


https://ejatlas.org/conflict/uranium-ex ... udi-arabia

Already from the Com 13 months ago around 60 tonnes of uranium in the country

Preliminary studies have estimated Saudi Arabia has around 60,000 tons of uranium ore, Maher Al-Odan, the chief atomic energy officer of KACARE, said at an electricity forum in Riyadh on Oct 11, 2017
......

http://www.arabnews.com/node/1185891/middle-east
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