Exploitation of methane hydrates, here we go! (Chikyu)

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moinsdewatt
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by moinsdewatt » 11/02/13, 15:21

Christophe wrote:In November 2012, there was a conference on hydrates:
http://www.bulletins-electroniques.com/ ... /71440.htm

.... Methane clathrates are present in large quantities on the seabed at depths of a few hundred meters. The estimated quantity would be close to 200 billion m3 of gas, i.e. 150 to 700 years of operation. The amount of methane hydrates in the continental reservoir is less well known. The relatively small surface (10 million km2) occupied by the permafrost suggests that it is less than in the oceanic reservoir.
..............


This figure is bizarre to say the least. faux.

Indeed, as I posted a few days ago, the Russian Gazprom alone produced 488 billion m3 in 2012. (in conventional gas).


Or it is the unity that is wrong. Maybe not m3 but tons.
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by moinsdewatt » 11/02/13, 15:35

The Japanese exploration program mentioned above (see first post) is carried out:

Drilling under 1000 m of water then 300 m of soil, to reach a layer of methane hydrate.
They will try to produce 10 m000 of methane per day for 3 weeks. (it is not huge in quantity).

World's first methane hydrate mining to begin off central Japan coast

February 4, 2013

The Japanese government has revealed that its Japan Oil, Gas, and Metals National Corp. has dispatched a mining ship that will begin the world's first offshore test to excavate methane hydrate from the seabed. As a potential new energy source, the search for methane hydrate will take place in the eastern Nankai Trough, roughly 70 kilometers (43.5 miles) off Aichi Prefecture's Atsumi Peninsula, in central Japan.

The oil, gas, and metal company's deep-sea drilling ship Chikyu set sail last week for an offshore well that drilled last year. Measuring 1,000 meters (0.6 miles) deep, the well reaches a 300 meter (980 feet) layer of methane hydrate under the seabed, where the testing is to take place. Also known as “burning ice,” there has been much attention on methane hydrate as a new plentiful natural fuel resource.

The next step will involve inserting a large pipe down into the well in order to separate methane hydrate into methane gas and water. If everything goes smoothly, and there are no delays in scheduling, the extraction will begin in March seeing the removal of as much as 10,000 cubic meters of gas per day over a two-week period. Estimates say that Japan's coastal waters hold nearly 100 times the amount of natural gas that the country uses per year, and the government Industry Ministry plans to eventually survey the Sea of ​​Japan for methane hydrate.


http://japandailypress.com/worlds-first ... st-0422630
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by Christophe » 11/02/13, 16:24

moinsdewatt wrote:This figure is bizarre to say the least. faux.

Indeed, as I posted a few days ago, the Russian Gazprom alone produced 488 billion m3 in 2012. (in conventional gas).


Or it is the unity that is wrong. Maybe not m3 but tons.


Right you are right, I did not tilt while reading ... verification: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaz_naturel

In 2005, according to BP, the world produced 2 billion cubic meters of natural gas,


So it may be about m3 of hydrates "in the ground" so at high pressure ... or then we must read 200 billion which would stick with a world consumption of 000 billion / year (= 3000 years of reserves ) ... or they are simply years of operation not aiming to meet 70% of global gas demand ...

As usual, you should always be wary of volume units ... when the pressure is not given with!
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by jlt22 » 11/03/13, 11:32

Japan is today starting prospecting for methane hydrates off the coast.

Tonight in Asia: Japan attacks a “burning ice” deposit

The Japanese government is launching offshore exploration for methane hydrate deposits. Some experts say that these deposits are, on a global scale, greater than the oil reserves, but their extraction promises to be very delicate.

Two years to the day after the destruction of the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, the government will begin today, off its coast, prospecting for methane hydrate deposits, commonly known as “burning ice”, with the hope to update a new energy source to power the country. An exploration vessel chartered by Jogmec (Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp) and the Ministry of Industry will carry out, in the basement of the Nankai marine pit, the first production tests for these hydrates from methane, compounds of ice and natural gas resulting from the decomposition of organic matter.
Some experts say that these deposits are, on a global scale, greater than the current oil reserves, but their extraction promises to be extremely delicate. Jogmec, which has tested in Canadian permafrost a technique of "depressurization" of these methane crystals, hopes to go back from the depths of tens of thousands of cubic meters of gas per day during the next two weeks of experimentation. If the technique proves effective, commercial exploitation could be launched by 2018. (...)


source: http://www.lesechos.fr/economie-politiq ... 545833.php
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by Christophe » 13/03/13, 02:52

Thanks JT, some additional technical info here: http://www.boursorama.com/actualites/le ... fc56ce0671

Japanese researchers succeeded Tuesday for the first time in extracting gas from methane hydrates from the seabed, a resource sometimes called "the ice that burns" that could save Japan from energy scarcity.

Preparations have been underway for years and the test started this morning, Industry Minister Toshimitsu Motegi told reporters on Tuesday.

"Our ambition is to make the technologies more reliable in order to achieve commercial exploitation", he explained.

"We managed to produce a certain amount of gas this morning, about four hours after the start of the experiment," said a ministry official later.

The goal is to stabilize a stable extraction for about two weeks.

Mr. Motegi said he was all the more pleased that, technically, the production of methane hydrate gas is more complex than that of shale gas, considered by some to be a revolutionary resource.

This attempt, which had been preceded by continental extraction experiments a few years ago in Canada, was led by the national company JOGMEC and the Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) about 80 kilometers off the Atsumi peninsula in the waters of Aichi prefecture (south-central).

The experiment, carried out 330 meters underground below 1.000 meters deep, consists in causing a pressure drop to recover the gas, enclosed with water in crystallized form in the surface sediments of deep ocean waters, under high pressure and low temperature conditions.

(...)
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by moinsdewatt » 09/06/14, 12:47

A New Zealand and German team has identified a network of a hundred methane hydrate reservoirs off the East coast of New Zealand:

NZ - German 3D survey reveals massive seabed gas hydrate and methane system

Monday, May 12, 2014, 11:51 am


A joint New Zealand-German research team has discovered a huge network of frozen methane and methane gas in sediments and in the ocean near New Zealand's east coast. The 16-strong team is using state-of-the-art 3D and 2D seismic and echosounder technology to map both forms of methane within the ocean and beneath the seafloor.

The area off the North Island's east coast is known to have very large active landslides, up to 15km long and 100m thick, and the team set out to discover what is causing them to move.

What they discovered was direct evidence of widespread gas in the sediment and ocean, and indications of large areas of methane hydrate, ice-like frozen methane, below the seafloor.

The team has identified 99 gas flares in a 50 km2 area, venting from the seabed in columns up to 250 m high. This is believed to be the densest concentration of seafloor gas vents known in New Zealand. 3D seismic data show that landslides and faults allow the gas built up in the sediment to be released into the ocean.

This discovery reveals a hydrate and gas field very different from others known in New Zealand.

“Previously all gas venting sites have been in deeper water and associated with large earthquake faults” say NIWA marine geologist and voyage leader Dr Joshu Mountjoy.

“What we have found is high density methane flares in very shallow water, as well as gas building up beneath a large landslide and being released along the landslide margins”.
.............

http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/SC1405/S ... system.htm
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by moinsdewatt » 09/06/14, 13:10

New prospecting for methane hydrates in the Sea of ​​Japan

April 16, 2014 Romandie

TOKYO - A new methane hydrate prospecting campaign began on Tuesday in the Japan Sea (west) and southeast of the northern island of Hokkaido, the energy agency said. future on the exploitation of this energy resource which would overflow the Japanese seabed.

The existence of methane hydrates, sometimes called burning ice, is proven in several places around the archipelago, but this resource is still not exploited for technical and economic reasons.

The Ministry of Industry (Meti) had undertaken in June 2013 for the first time such prospecting in the Sea of ​​Japan in order to quantify the volume of energy.

Private institutes had taken the lead in mapping it.

The new campaign which started on Tuesday is a continuation. It will cover five areas and will last until June 15. It brings together a public research organization (the National Institute of Advanced Science and Technology, AIST) and specialists from the Meiji Private University. A collection of samples will also take place between early June and early July.

These investigations are part of a larger plan to exploit these resources beyond 2020, as it will take years to make the techniques more reliable and attempt to significantly reduce the cost of extraction.

Japan is, however, one of the most advanced in this area. In March 2013, Japanese researchers had succeeded for the first time in the world in extracting methane hydrates gas from the seabed.

This attempt, which had been preceded by continental extraction experiments a few years ago in Canada, was carried out by the national company JOGMEC and AIST about 80 kilometers off the Atsumi peninsula in the waters of Pacific (center-south).

The underwater depths of Japanese territorial waters off an extended stretch of its southern coast, from Shizuoka to Wakayama, conceal very large quantities which are said to be close to ten years of gas needs for the archipelago. But according to private sector researchers, the best deposits are on the other side, in the Sea of ​​Japan, hence the current campaigns.

If Japan is surrounded by it, it is because methane hydrates are mainly present in places with high seismicity, explains Chiharu Aoyama, researcher specializing in energy resources at the Independent Center for General Research.

Japan, at the junction of four tectonic plates, is undoubtedly the most shaken country on the planet, with more than 20% of the most violent earthquakes recorded on Earth each year.

According to some estimates, in total, the archipelago would hold for a century or more of gas consumption in the form of methane hydrate, while it is until now dependent on foreign countries, forced to import more than 90 % of its energy.


http://www.romandie.com/news/Nouvelle-p ... 468652.rom
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by moinsdewatt » 26/07/15, 14:44

Following previous tests, another test well in methane hydrates will be drilled in Alaska on the North slope.
cost of $ 30 million. Japanese people interested in participating financially.


Another round of Slope methane hydrate research planned

BY TIM BRADNER, ALASKA JOURNAL OF COMMERCE Published: 2015.07.15

Another test of methane hydrates on the North Slope, a potential huge new gas resource, is being planned.

State officials are in discussions with the US Department of Energy and the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp., or JOGMC on possible joint-sponsorship, and talks are planned with North Slope producers about potential sites for a test within one of the operating units on the Slope, Commissioner of Natural Resources Mark Myers said.

A technical evaluation of different sites is now underway, Myers said. Drilling within an existing industry unit is preferable for cost reasons but sites on nearby unleased state lands set aside for hydrate research are also being evaluated; those are lacking in infrastructure and less is known about the potential for hydrate accumulations, however.

Myers, a former head of the US Geological Survey and Alaska Oil and Gas Division director, has long been intrigued with the possibility of that hydrates could eventually be a huge new energy resource. He now sits on the US Department of Energy's hydrates advisory board.

Both the DOE and the US Geological Survey have been extensively engaged in hydrates work, Myers said. The DOE advisory board's recommendations for continued work focuses on not only as hydrates as a potential energy resource, but also as a hazard (drillers can unexpectedly drill into a hydrate, causing shallow gas blowouts) and the contribution that hydrate melting, mainly offshore, and release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, could be making in global climate change.

JOGMC, a Japanese industry group that participated in previous North Slope hydrates work and has also been engaged in hydrates research offshore Japan, may take part in helping fund a new slope test. The cost of the well could reach $ 30 million.
........................

long article: http://www.alaskajournal.com/Alaska-Jou ... h-planned/
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Re: Exploitation of methane hydrates, let's go! (Chikyu)




by moinsdewatt » 08/07/18, 23:59

The Chinese want to get into methane hydrates:
Guangzhou to become new methane hydrate exploration base
By Staff reporter July 4, 2018

China's Ministry of Land and Resources has officially chosen Nansha Longxue Island in Guangzhou as a base to conduct further exploration for, extraction of and research on methane hydrates, a local news portal reported on Tuesday.

Preliminary work is under way on the base, which will be completed in 2021 and include a scientific research center, a drill core store and a deepwater terminal.

http://interfaxenergy.com/gasdaily/arti ... ation-base
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Re: Exploitation of methane hydrates, let's go! (Chikyu)




by moinsdewatt » 14/07/20, 09:58

WHO IS STILL LOOKING FOR OCEANIC METHANE HYDRATES?

7 FEBRUARY 2020 DANIEL ALLARD

If we tell you that 1 cubic centimeter of this ice releases up to 164 cubic centimeters of methane! Yes: 164 times the setting… Under particular temperature and pressure conditions, ice (H2O) can trap gas molecules, forming a sort of cage trapping the gas molecules. The resulting compounds are called gas hydrates or even clathrates (from the Latin clatatrus, encapsulated). The case that interests us here is that of methane hydrates, an ice that contains an enormous amount of gas.

A lot of gas!

Along the southeastern coast of the United States alone, an area of ​​26 square kilometers contains 000 Gt (billion tonnes) of carbon. This is more than 35 times the consumption of natural gas in the USA in 100!

Globally, it is even estimated that methane hydrates from the ocean floor contain twice as much carbon equivalent as all of the known natural gas, oil and coal deposits. Wow!

JAPAN ACTIVELY IN THE RACE
Because the Japanese government shut down most of the country's nuclear power plants following the Fukushima disaster and seismic surveys and exploratory drilling have highlighted the presence of around 1 billion cubic meters of methane off its coast East, Japan is currently at the head of the powers trying to exploit this "ice that is burning".

Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC), which in 2013 succeeded in successfully extracting methane during a test off the Atsumi and Shima peninsulas using its research vessel Chikyu, was planning a second round of tests. in situ for 2015. For the moment, it has not been possible for us to learn more to confirm whether the 2015 phase has actually been carried out. The internet is silent.

Only the 2013 experiment, carried out 330 meters underground under 1 meters of sea depth is publicly documented. It consisted in causing a pressure drop to recover the gas, trapped with water in crystalline form in the surface sediments of deep ocean waters, under conditions of high pressure and low temperature. Gas had actually been obtained on the surface for 000 days (6 m120). Enough to then plan an extraction platform to be developed between 000 and 3 with a commercial exploitation in sight.
.......

It is true that since then, the extraction of clathrates has been presented as a “potential ecological bomb”.

The Canadian authorities have also put an end to investments in the same direction, in particular after cooperation with Japan (see box). Because the extraction of clathrates is said to be dangerous and expensive.

For the first time, an interesting technological solution had been demonstrated at the Mallik site, in the far north of Canada. A rapidly international research site for the study of arctic natural gas hydrates in the Mackenzie Delta. In 2002, an enlarged consortium of seven international partners and more than 300 scientists and engineers had allowed the drilling of a well with a depth of 1 m for exploitation and two adjacent wells for scientific observation.

It is also thanks to the work at Mallik that Japan was able to confirm the technique of pressure drop - depressurization - as a process for recovering gas.

But Canada no longer believes it.

Critics fear, for example, that this type of exploitation will cause immense submarine landslides on the continental slope, causing very important tsunamis threatening the neighboring populations.

FRANCE IS SEEKING TO UNDERSTAND
What is certain is that in September 2015, forty geologists and chemists went out to the Black Sea, off the Romanian city of Constanta, to study the dynamics of methane hydrates, aboard the French oceanographic vessel " Why not ? »As part of the GHASS scientific mission.

This campaign was carried out by Ifremer in collaboration with German (GEOMAR), Romanian (GeoEcoMar), Norwegian (NGI) and Spanish (University of Barcelona) researchers.

Stakes of the GHASS campaign
Improve knowledge on methane hydrates and their stability in a context of global change;
Identify the hazards linked to the sedimentary deformation of the seabed (“submarine landslides”).
Knowledge about this exceptional energy resource is relatively recent, because it was not until 1996, in the Pacific Ocean, that the research vessel Sonne ascended from a depth of 785 meters, about 500 kg of hydrate. of methane.

Greenhouse gas par excellence, any handling of methane requires extreme care.



https://commercemonde.com/2017/02/hydrates-de-methane/
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