The dirty war of rare earth in China

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The dirty war of rare earth in China




by Christophe » 22/05/13, 21:10

52-minute documentary on the famous rare earths ...

Rare earths are metals with mysterious names: cerium, terbium, samarium, gadolinium ... Little known, they are however very present around us: in our screens, our phones and even in our banknotes. Rare earths are the oil of the XNUMXst century, the engine of today's industries. With the closure of mines in the USA, China is currently the only producer of these metals. The rest of the world has engaged in a merciless struggle against this monopoly. The rare earth war is the story of an economic conflict with devastating consequences for people and the environment: a dirty war. In five years, China will no longer be able to meet its own land needs. The Chinese seek partners and carry out a reversal of strategy. This country which had worked so hard to maintain this monopoly does not want any more: exhaustion of the resource and pollution oblige it to seek abroad the answer to its growing needs. The whole world embarks on the search for these rare earths not so rare as that: there are deposits in South Africa, Australia, Canada, on the Moon and at the bottom of the seas. Closed mines reopen in the USA. But people are more demanding on the environmental level; it may be an opportunity to rethink the world!

Origin of the media: France
Duration: 51mn 52s
Production Year: 2012
Production: Serge Turquier, Guillaume Pitron
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Re: The Dirty Rare Earth War in China




by izentrop » 28/01/18, 20:11

The follow-up: Guillaume Pitron and his work The war of rare metals invited to 28 '


We left the dirty work to the Chinese and we recycle almost nothing.

Macron and his mining projects.
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Re: The Dirty Rare Earth War in China




by izentrop » 28/01/18, 23:13

Want the latest super concentrated and efficient smartphone at an ecological price that must be taken into account https://www.techniques-ingenieur.fr/act ... ares-1296/

The batteries of electric cars with high energy concentration this is also the case, but for wind turbines, electric motors and solar panels, we are starting to find such efficient displays, it seems: https://www.techniques-ingenieur.fr/act ... ires-1300/
https://www.enercon.de/fr/technologie/c ... eoliennes/
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Re: The Dirty Rare Earth War in China




by moinsdewatt » 02/04/19, 02:05

China has become the first importer of rare earths

By Claire Fages RFI 29 March 2019

Total reversal on the world market of rare earths, this metal family so useful in the transport of the future and green energy: China, the leading producer of rare earths, imports today almost as much as it exports.

China remains the world's largest supplier of rare earths. But she is also importing more and more. Last year her purchases of rare earths abroad nearly tripled to reach 41 000 tons, almost as much as the 53000 she exported to 2018. Chinese imports even exceed exports for seven key rare earth metals, especially praseodymium, found in permanent magnets of wind turbines or electric vehicles. China becomes dependent on rare earths when it was able to dry the market all by itself in the early 2010 years.

Mine closures

The reason for this change in Chinese trade? Beijing has begun to close the Chinese rare earth mines, explains Gaétan Lefebvre BRGM, "to limit their effects on the environment, there were a lot of illegal and very polluting mines, and to limit the depletion of the resource ". Production quotas have been declining since the second half of last year.
"It is also about preventing other countries from having access to the raw material, since China has developed on its soil a powerful permanent magnet manufacturing industry, 80% of world production. There is therefore a very strong Chinese domestic demand for rare earths that China is trying to satisfy through imports. " Even if sometimes it is Chinese rare earths that return to China after passing through Burma.

Control the resource

Apart from the Australian mine of the Lynas company whose rare earths are refined in Malaysia, all existing mines outside China now supply China. Including Mountain Pass, in the United States! This deposit that had reopened in 2012 because China had imposed an embargo on its rare earths, then went bankrupt in 2015 after the bursting of the bubble. It reopened last year thanks to investments ... Chinese.
It is also a Chinese consortium that put into production last January the Kvanefjeld rare earth mine in Greenland, the largest deposit outside China.


http://www.rfi.fr/emission/20190329-chi ... rres-rares
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Re: The Dirty Rare Earth War in China




by moinsdewatt » 02/01/22, 23:56

Merger of 3 rare earth producers in China. This grouping will control 70% of production in China.

China merges key rare earth producers

By Zachary Skidmore 23 Dec 2021

The new mining giant will be formed of three government-owned companies, strengthening China's control over the rare earth industry.

The Chinese Government has approved the merger of three government-owned rare earth miners into a state-owned giant, which will become the worlds largest producer of the resource.

The group will be formed through merging the rare earth units of the government-owned China Minmetals, the Aluminum Corp. of China and the Ganzhou Rare Earth Group. The new company will be named the China Rare-Earths Group and its main focus will be the development of mines in the south of China.

The state-owned assets supervision and administration commission will hold a 31.21% stake in the new group, while Chinalco, China Minmetals and the Ganzhou Rare Earth Group will each own 20.33%. In response to the news, the share price of China Minmetals Rare Earth surged as much as 8.5% in Shenzhen and the Aluminum Corp. of China gained more than 5% in Shanghai.

China's dominance

China already dominates the mining and production of rare earths. As of 2020, China produced 57.6% of the world's rare earths, making it by far the world's largest rare earth producer.

The merger has been described as the latest step by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) to consolidate an industry beset by drastic price swings. The merger will allow for a reduction of competitive pressure in the industry by shrinking the number of Chinese rare earths producers from six to four.

The China Rare-Earths Group will subsequently control 70% of China's rare earths output. The process of consolidation follows a similar strategy used by the CCP in other industries including rail transport and shipping lines, to prevent rival groups from undercutting each other when bidding for lucrative overseas contracts.

CRU Group consultant Daan de Jonge said the combined entity would be second only to the China Northern Rare-Earth Group in terms of overall rare earths output. “This will mean that the pricing power of key rare earths, such as dysprosium and terbium, will be in the hands of one 'super group',” he said.


https://www.mining-technology.com/news/ ... are-earth/
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Re: The Dirty Rare Earth War in China




by phil59 » 03/01/22, 23:37

Electric motors, if brushed, no rare earth.

Catalytic converter = rare earth ... don't forget either ....
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hmmmmm, hmmmmmmmmmmmmm, hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhmmmmmmmmm, huh, hmmmmmmmmmmmmm.

: Oops: : Cry: :( : Shock:
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Re: The Dirty Rare Earth War in China




by GuyGadeboisTheBack » 03/01/22, 23:39

And (modern) electric cars if not rare earths, not batteries, garage.
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Re: The Dirty Rare Earth War in China




by phil59 » 04/01/22, 10:38

Yes, but you don't have to have 500 km of autonomy on the motorway to drive electric, unlike all those who say that they can only drive an EV if 500 km of autonomy ... The big part of those who never really drive an EV, or who leave without route planning.
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hmmmmm, hmmmmmmmmmmmmm, hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhmmmmmmmmm, huh, hmmmmmmmmmmmmm.

: Oops: : Cry: :( : Shock:
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Re: The Dirty Rare Earth War in China




by Janic » 04/01/22, 14:25

GuyGadeboisLeRetour »04/01/22, 00:39
And (modern) electric cars if not rare earths, not batteries, garage.
in short, big bullshit! and not just vehicles but everything that runs on electricity. With their stupid projects, it is copper that will be lacking or be worth more than gold, and it begins.
And not better with hydrogen! We run after the tail without ever being able to catch it.
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