Paris in the snow, snow, snow ...

Warming and Climate Change: causes, consequences, analysis ... Debate on CO2 and other greenhouse gas.
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Did67
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View Did67 » 09/12/10, 13:52

Christophe wrote:
And as we always ask more requirements to everyone (except maybe, sorry did not, in the national education) ... |


If so, we also ask. The demand in terms of education (not done before) is enormous. The last straw: parents who do not get by with their child, who ask us to cope with 25 ... while complaining about paying too much tax (and these are not just minimum wages). The pressure to welcome people "with disabilities" as we say now ... Etc ..

On the other hand, I quite agree with you (without agreeing on the overall diagnosis "less taxes"; "damn officials", etc ...): I am not that the system responds to this request .

Come and teach 25 young apprentices in CAP ... just a few days; the material you want ... and we'll talk about it again! But a few days. An hour like that, with the effect of novelty, it's too easy!

Shit, I slipped seriously. Here I am in the ditch. When will the next salt spread ????
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Christophe
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View Christophe » 09/12/10, 14:21

I spoke in terms of catastrophic level of content ... we ask students ...

I will always remember the day I came across this book of preparation for the certificate of study (which passed CM2 if I am not wrong) which included a chapter on the double integrals that I personally saw in ... prep class ...

I'm not asking to come back to such a level ... but the problem is that, apparently since I went to primary school, the level would have dropped again ...

did67 wrote:Come and teach 25 young apprentices in CAP ... just a few days; the material you want ... and we'll talk about it again!


I've been there ... 3 weeks as a replacement :)
Actually it's not easy ...

But we are HS there ... we can continue here: https://www.econologie.com/forums/les-lacune ... 10049.html or rather here: https://www.econologie.com/forums/education- ... t7683.html
Last edited by Christophe the 09 / 12 / 10, 14: 27, 1 edited once.
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Alain G
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View Alain G » 09/12/10, 14:27

Damn it seems to be quite an event the few cm of snow in France!

Here we already have 55 cm on the ground and we are still announcing a storm for Sunday.

3 1 / 2 hours of snow removal only this monday for the last 45 cm and I'm fed up !!!!!


Here we are forced to put winter tire because our good mom government has decided for us that it's better as well

The automatic transmission lends itself better to our harsh winter than the manual, not to start but sloping because there is no loss in gear change.

Global warming is not here! : Evil:
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sherkanner
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View sherkanner » 09/12/10, 14:31

Global warming may not be the best term to use.
Climate disruption seems more appropriate, but that's another topic.

And if not yes, in France 5cm of snow, and it is alert orange (except alsace moselle)
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Gaston
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View Gaston » 09/12/10, 15:01

sherkanner wrote:And if not yes, in France 5cm of snow, and it is alert orange (except alsace moselle)
Compare the width of the streets of the French cities with that of the cities of Quebec, you will quickly understand that we can not do snowplow in cities in France (especially without breaking the beautiful signage that stands in the middle of many intersections).

Regarding snow tires, they are easy to use in areas where snow sets in, but in those where there is 2 or 3 snowy episodes of 3 days each during the winter :?

Do you imagine in the Paris region to assemble and disassemble 4 or 6 wheels once per winter with each snow alert?
Of course, as the vast majority do not have a garage, do you do it along the sidewalk in the rain the night before?
They must be removed as soon as the snow has melted so as not to deteriorate very quickly by rolling on the tar.
Not to mention that tires that have not been used during 3 or 4 years are good to replace, even if they have 0 km (not very econological :( )
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View Christophe » 09/12/10, 15:08

Gaston wrote:Compare the width of the streets of the French cities with that of the cities of Quebec, you will quickly understand that we can not do snowplow in cities in France (especially without breaking the beautiful signage that stands in the middle of many intersections).


The big problem is not the center of cities ... but the major axes!

When we see what we pay to the Sanef and the budget of the DDE, we expect something from them other than "maintenance" work and the collection of tolls (tolls still in operation despite being blocked by snow just for the record) ...

For example: our street I bury itself if it is not cleared: there may be 20 cars that pass by day and it rolls 10 / 20 km / h above, no problem ...

Do not clear the major axes is economic hostage taking!

I had a gueulante last February https://www.econologie.com/forums/paliseul-e ... t9231.html

Gaston wrote:Not to mention that tires that have not been used during 3 or 4 years are good to replace, even if they have 0 km (not very econological :( )


Really? : Shock:
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View sherkanner » 09/12/10, 15:09

Uh, for the snow tires, you can keep them while it's cold
They are designed for temperatures below 10-12 ° C and are more efficient than summer tires.
Beyond 18 ° C yes, you hear them fall apart when you roll and you have to change them.
It is more the temperature which abimes than bitumen.

And then with 5-6 ° C in rainy weather, snow tires are significantly more efficient than summer tires, which are a bit like a piece of wood.
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View Christophe » 09/12/10, 15:12

Uh what are we talking about here?

Snow tires or 4 tires?

Snow tires = studded tires and I am not sure that it is still mounted at home ...

4 seasons are often equated with snow tires ...

The 1er summer I stored our 4 seasons tires in our greenhouse (it goes up to 40 ° C) and I can tell you that they are always spotless. By the way this year, lazy to change, I left them for the summer. : Cheesy:
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View sherkanner » 09/12/10, 15:23

Good v'la confusion, I will try to untangle a little while ca.

There's been the tires, the so usually, works well for a moderate warm temperatures. Worse by cold temperatures, and true piece of wood when frozen.

The 4 seasons tires are a little better in cold weather, and for the snow, they are a little better than the summer tires, but insufficient. They are related to summer tires, they are not snow tires. (risk of PV in Germany / Austria with this kind of tires in winter)

The recognizable snow tires with the symbol M + S on the sidewall. These are snow and mud and snow tires and are the ones to be used in winter, up to 10-12 ° C. If there is no more risk of frost / snow, we can put back the summer tires.

The winter tires studded them are actually only reserved for the snow and are strongly disadvised on the bitumen. Generally, they are only used in the mountains or snow removal is impossible (where we must use chains)

Voila, I hope it is a little clearer.
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View Christophe » 09/12/10, 15:37

OK, thanks!

sherkanner wrote:The recognizable snow tires with the symbol M + S on the sidewall. These are snow and mud and snow tires and are the ones to be used in winter, up to 10-12 ° C. If there is no more risk of frost / snow, we can put back the summer tires.


It's M + S that we have (I just checked), that we left all the year and that I stored without problem in the greenhouse ... They have no trace of deterioration .

I was sure it was 4 seasons : Cheesy:

OK for the winter studded tire name. As it does not confuse with snow tire :)

For details I found this on Wiki:

Marking is done on the sidewall of the tire. For 195 / 65 15 R 91 H 6 M + S for example:

* 195 is the width of the inflated tire, measured from side to side (in millimeters). This is not the width of the tread that does not appear and may vary, for example, between two 195 tires
* 65 is the "series" (height of sidewall to tire width) expressed as a percentage (here 65% - ie 126,75 mm). If this indication does not appear (usually old tires), this is by default an 80 series.
* R indicates the radial type (B would indicate a "bias" carcass, D a diagonal carcass)
* 15 is the diameter of the rim in inches (1 inch corresponding to 2,54 cm)
* 91 Load capacity index, 91 = 615 kg (see [30] standards of ETRTO, European Tire and Rim Technical Organization)
* H speed code [31] indicates the maximum speed at which a passenger car tire may be subjected - (89H, tire whose limit is 210 km / h)
o Q = 160 km / h
o R = 170 km / h
o S = 180 km / h
o T = 190 km / h
o U = 200 km / h
o H = 210 km / h
o VR> 210 km / h
o V = 240 km / h
o ZR> 240 km / h
o W = 270 km / h
o Y = 300 km / h

* M + S (Mud + Snow) mud and snow. Sign affixed to winter tires or any season

Note: Sometimes a letter C is written on the side of the tire, just after 185R14-C for example. This letter indicates that the tire load index is higher than normal. These tires are usually intended to be mounted on a van or motorhome.

* "Tubeless" indicates a tubeless tire, "Tube type" indicates a tire with inner tube
* The date of manufacture of the tire is mentioned in 4 digits; the first 2 indicate the week of manufacture and the last two the year of manufacture
Example: 1702 is a tire made during the 17th week of the year 2002. When there is only 3 digits, this means that the tire was manufactured before the year 2000. If a triangle is present in front of these 3 digits it is that it is the 1990 decade and if there is none, the 1980 decade. 259 is therefore a tire made 25e week of 1989.
* DOT (Department of Transportation) markings can be found for tires for North America. Almost all tires sold in Europe also have this inscription and the next four digits these three letters correspond to the date of manufacture as indicated above.
* The E1 code: Control sign for the European standard, 1 = Germany
* The serial number of the tire is composed of a series of numbers and letters. This is a unique number assigned to each tire. It is particularly noted during each tire assessment. According to the brands, it takes different forms.
* The so-called Run Flat tires bear one of the following marks: "Run flat RFT tires" / "RUN ON FLAT" / "ROF" / "DSST".


Tables of the load indices and speed: http://www.pneus-online.fr/indices-char ... seils.html

Site that includes many other infos, to see. For example: http://www.pneus-online.fr/guide-de-l-a ... seils.html
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