Reviews of wood stoves: Franco Belge, Godin or Supra?

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Gregconstruct
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by Gregconstruct » 19/10/08, 19:48

Anyway, one thing to emphasize is the importance of the density of the wood that is burned.
The denser the wood, the higher the yield!
Since a conifer is generally not very dense, it is therefore of little interest in terms of yield.
In addition, resins tend to produce a massive amount of tar.
Even if the draft remains good, your chimney may be polluted by tars in large quantities which induces an increased risk of chimney fire (note that I am talking well on this one, you have to cross the calendar).
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by the middle » 19/10/08, 19:54

My brother only burns fir too,
But his stove is a "cassette", or "insert" in cast iron, with refractory bricks, the combustion is totally different from my stove (vermiculite)
It burns better at home, I think (for fir)
The temperature of the hearth is lower, the gases trapped in the wood exit slower, in short the gas air gas carburation is more balanced.
In addition, it has ventilation that blows on the outside body of the stove, which further slows the rise in temperature in the hearth.
In conclusion, I would say that a stove made of vermiculite is not made to burn fir ... :?
With my brother it works wonderfully.
I should have made a video of the two poels ...
Ok I will, a little video is much better than 100 speeches :D
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Gregconstruct
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by Gregconstruct » 19/10/08, 20:28

Perhaps, but the yield is not the same as with oak or ash or beech!
Which means that in the end, it costs you more!
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by the middle » 19/10/08, 20:35

Gregconstruct wrote:Perhaps, but the yield is not the same as with oak or ash or beech!
Which means that in the end, it costs you more!

Burning oak, ash, or being is the best.
But almost free firewood burning ... the yield is 100% : Cheesy:
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by Gregconstruct » 19/10/08, 20:37

Raaaaaaaahhhhh, stubborn against stubborn ...
And what do you do with toxic vapors?
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by the middle » 19/10/08, 20:41

Gregconstruct wrote:Raaaaaaaahhhhh, stubborn against stubborn ...
And what do you do with toxic vapors?

Why should be or ash pollute less than fir?
Am po specialist in combustion of wood species. :?
Tales :D
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by Gregconstruct » 19/10/08, 20:45

To sum up: resins = gases which can be toxic.

Ash, beech, birch, oak and others, no resin = no toxic gas!
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by the middle » 19/10/08, 20:55

Gregconstruct wrote:To sum up: resins = gases which can be toxic.

Ash, beech, birch, oak and others, no resin = no toxic gas!

I do want to believe you.
But give me a proof, a text; I’m also going to do some research : Cheesy:
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by the middle » 19/10/08, 21:02

A start: ref: http://www.dutry.com/lire/qualite-bois.html
Quality of firewood
species
There are few differences between the species of firewood: the thermal / calorific value of perfectly dry wood varies between 5,1 kWh / kg for oak and 5,3 kWh / kg for fir and birch.

Some prefer hard wood, because it will give more beautiful flames and the embers will glow longer. However, the lighter essences lend themselves perfectly to combustion, even if it is faster. The choice is not problematic for a wood-burning stove. It will only have to burn for a few hours to diffuse its heat throughout the day. Hardwood is more suitable for continuous combustion stoves because it needs to be recharged less often.

Finally, resinous species, such as fir or birch, burn very well. However, they should be avoided in chimneys with poor draft or certain models of older stoves, as they produce more soot.

Dry split wood
Wood drying is much more important than gasoline. Indeed, the presence of water in the firewood absorbs a lot of energy during combustion. Freshly felled green wood contains up to 50% moisture. The maximum is 20%, 12 to 15% being ideal. The thermal / calorific value of wood at 15% humidity is approximately 4,1 kWh / kg.

The bark and sapwood burn much less than the heartwood in the center. Therefore, good firewood is always split. This quickly reaches the temperature necessary for good combustion of the bark. In addition, once split, the wood dries significantly faster. Without forgetting that the smaller the wood used, the larger the contact surface and the more efficient the combustion.

If you want to burn wood waste, first make sure that it does not contain toxic products, both for your health, that of your neighbors and for the preservation of the environment in general. The ideal solution is of course to use only non-toxic natural products to treat the wood. In case of doubt, it is better to deposit your waste in a place specially provided for this purpose, such as the municipal recycling center.

It is advisable to take in the wood one to two days before burning it and to store it in or near the heat source. For storage stoves, which are often still hot twenty-four hours after having burned them, simply place the small wood a few hours in advance in the hearth so that it is thoroughly dry (in the morning, for example , for the evening outbreak). This advice is not to be applied for wet wood.
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by the middle » 19/10/08, 21:24

Sorry Greg, I didn't find anything about the toxicity of softwood for firewood.
All that comes up often is the toxicity due to poor combustion. And also, the toxicity due to treated wood ...
But no toxicity due to a gasoline.
From experience, I have found that the tree needs a lot of air to burn well.
So the famous mass, which require great energy in a short time, are the most suitable for conifers.
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