Agriculture: problems and pollution, new technologies and solutionsLet’s rehabilitate industrial hemp!

Agriculture and soil. Pollution control, soil remediation, humus and new agricultural techniques.
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GuyGadebois
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Let’s rehabilitate industrial hemp!

Unread Messageby GuyGadebois » 02/03/20, 15:02

Hemp is a miraculous plant that was demonized in the USA in the 30s by lobbies in the cotton, paper and chemical industries (Dupont, again ...) who instrumentalize the virtue leagues (intentionally amalgamating recreational and industrial cannabis) giving birth to the Marihuana Tax Act which will introduce the taxation of all players in the hemp sector.

Nylon will then impose itself (Dupont, always) until the army considers this material as unsuitable for its needs (it creates allergies, promotes skin diseases, is putrescible and not as solid as expected).
The United States Department of Agriculture then sponsored a film "Hemp for victory" released in 1942 which encouraged farmers to plant textile hemp to participate in the war effort, a major consumer of fabric and ropes.

Remember that hemp is a rot-proof fiber, resistant to insects and UV rays, 8 times more resistant than cotton to traction, with which we can make fabrics as fine as silk, veils, ropes, paper. Its uses are almost unlimited.
The improvement will be short-lived and hemp will be banned after the war.
This for the fiber.

But let's review the qualities of this plant:

-It produces edible seeds (without psychotropic effect), with high nutritional value as well as an oil containing omega 3 and omega 6.
-After pressing them, there remains a very rich protein flour.
-It aerates the soil without depleting it.
-It chelates heavy metals.
-It can be used as green manure and does not need pesticides because it is naturally very resistant and few biological enemies.
-It can be used as an adjuvant in resin which can advantageously replace fiberglass.
-It was used in Chernobyl to neutralize cesium 137, strontium 90, and plutonium.
-It has an unbeatable fiber yield (liber): from 900 to 2700 kg per hectare, more than any other fiber plant.
-It only needs a little water and could replace cotton advantageously with all the advantages expected from a crop in an increasingly polluted future.
-It lends itself to any form of use: after removing the liber, the pulp of the plant can be transformed into a wide range of materials (plaster, stucco, fiberboard, concrete blocks and thermal insulation).
-It can give a bioplastic for 3D printing. Ford had in 1941 released a hemp bioplastic automobile weighing 500 kilos less than its equivalent steel model. Project abandoned of course!
The list is not exhaustive.
This is only industrial hemp. Medicinal hemp also holds great promise, as applications and properties for the various components of this plant are constantly being found. I won't talk about it here.

https://lvsl.fr/le-chanvre-industriel-c ... e-miracle/
https://www.nuntisunya.com/chanvre-textile/?lang=fr
https://www.nuntisunya.com/histoire-chanvre/?lang=fr
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GuyGadebois
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Re: Let's revitalize industrial hemp!

Unread Messageby GuyGadebois » 02/03/20, 17:21

Hemp plastic

Hemp plastic has everything of a future material, light and biodegradable.

Once the hemp stalks are stripped of their fibers, 77% of cellulose remains, a material from which trees and plants are made and from which biodegradable plastics can be made. Hemp grows quickly and is therefore very interesting for these types of durable plastics, known as "bioplastics". Light and biodegradable, they can replace many types of plastics from the petrochemical industry (and therefore made from petroleum).

Reduce global warming

Because of their ability to “lock in” carbon, hemp plastic and other hemp products can reduce global warming. During their growth, hemp crops absorb carbon dioxide (CO2) which pollutes the environment, retaining carbon (fundamental element of the life of plants and animals) from the atmosphere and releasing oxygen. When hemp is used to make materials that last a long time, this prevents this carbon from re-entering the atmosphere in the form of CO2. This capacity contributes to combating global warming, while the production of plastics from petrochemicals releases significant CO2 emissions and generates toxic by-products.

https://hashmuseum.com/fr/la-plante/cha ... de-chanvre
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dede2002
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Re: Let's revitalize industrial hemp!

Unread Messageby dede2002 » 02/03/20, 18:05

You mean we can make Nylon from hemp?

I prefer hemp ropes :P

For the anecdote: when I was at the civil protection (not to make the army) we had trained to bring down stretchers by the window, with hemp ropes resistant to 300 kg. I had asked why we did not use nylon ropes which withstood more than a ton for the same diameter, the answer was that they are much less resistant to abrasion and also to fire. The firefighters still use hemp ropes, and it is still grown in field crops, at least in Switzerland (I'm not talking about CBD crops) :)
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Re: Let's revitalize industrial hemp!

Unread Messageby GuyGadebois » 02/03/20, 18:18

dede2002 wrote:You mean we can make Nylon from hemp?

No...
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Re: Let's revitalize industrial hemp!

Unread Messageby Christophe » 03/03/20, 09:09

dede2002 wrote:I had asked why we did not use nylon ropes which withstood more than a ton for the same diameter, the answer was that they are much less resistant to abrasion and also to fire.


I think that hemp is also much more durable against UV and other physico-chemical attacks ...

I didn't know that hemp was used by firefighters!
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Re: Let's revitalize industrial hemp!

Unread Messageby GuyGadebois » 03/03/20, 12:55

We do not see much the cantors of "realistic ecology" who praise their cotton BT shit ... The term "hemp" would it be a bad word?
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Re: Let's revitalize industrial hemp!

Unread Messageby Christophe » 03/03/20, 12:59

No it's not a bad word but some people quickly associate it with schmitt smokers! Besides I hesitated to place a "smoke like a firefighter" ... but I did not find the inspiration and the link with a rope : Mrgreen:

Do we make cotton ropes? : Cheesy:

Otherwise it seems to me that Alsace was a major producer of hemp at one time ...
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GuyGadebois
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Re: Let's revitalize industrial hemp!

Unread Messageby GuyGadebois » 03/03/20, 13:08

Christophe wrote:No it's not a bad word but some people quickly associate it with schmitt smokers! Besides I hesitated to place a "smoke like a firefighter" ... but I did not find the inspiration and the link with a rope : Mrgreen:

Do we make cotton ropes? : Cheesy: <<< Yes, for decorative use

Otherwise it seems to me that Alsace was a major producer of hemp at one time ... <<< All over France ... 176 ha cultivated in the middle of the 000th century

Compared to industrial hemp, cotton looks like an ecological disaster and an uninteresting fabric. In addition, its uses are very limited, its properties and performance much less.
Alas, cotton gradually replaced hemp from the beginning of the XNUMXth century.

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chanvre
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Re: Let's revitalize industrial hemp!

Unread Messageby Christophe » 03/03/20, 13:32

So we don't make cotton strings! : Cheesy:
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Re: Let's revitalize industrial hemp!

Unread Messageby GuyGadebois » 03/03/20, 13:55

Christophe wrote:So we don't make cotton strings! : Cheesy:

Not strong enough.
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