Our participatory garden in Moselle

Agriculture and soil. Pollution control, soil remediation, humus and new agricultural techniques.
sicetaitsimple
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Re: Our Participatory Garden in Moselle




View sicetaitsimple » 07/11/19, 19:12

emilio57 wrote:Soil poor in clay and silt. However there is something more than sand, because it is paradoxically hard, compact, even where we have covered.


I just allow myself to copy a hypothesis formulated on page 3 of this thread:

Yes something is wrong ... And I repeat, on the basis of the few photos (aspect, color) and history described (gardens, houses of miners) an assumption of relatively substantial contributions over several decades of ashes I may be completely wrong, it would be no worse ... there is only a chemical analysis of soil that would allow to see clearly.
Composed mainly of SiO2 (sand to simplify), the main industrial use of coal ash is the incorporation into the clinker and cement production line, either upstream (in the "raw", before introduction into the furnace), or downstream (at the clinker grinding level). And in both cases it is not silica that is sought, but Al2O3 and calcium compounds ... which are the basis of a good cement!
Just a question to Emilio: in some places, when it's dry, stirring, you do not see tiny black particles, which would be the sign of unburned?
Let's be clear, I wish I was wrong!
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emilio57
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Re: Our Participatory Garden in Moselle




View emilio57 » 07/11/19, 21:24

sicetaitsimple wrote:
emilio57 wrote:Soil poor in clay and silt. However there is something more than sand, because it is paradoxically hard, compact, even where we have covered.


Just a question to Emilio: in some places, when it's dry, stirring, you do not see tiny black particles, which would be the sign of unburned?
Let's be clear, I wish I was wrong! [/ I]


Good evening was simple.
He seemed to have answered no. I checked, and in the video we have a preview
But I would re-check
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emilio57
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Re: Our Participatory Garden in Moselle




View emilio57 » 21/06/20, 13:53

Hello everyone,

after a winter when we have amended as much as possible with multitudes of OM, straw (50% of the total), horse manure decanted for 1 year (30%), hay, shearing, leaves, brf etc ... the land is already better appearance and especially less compact, more tender.
But a happiness never arriving alone, we are infested with slugs and I weigh my words so many there are. Each plant is attacked, pounded, even with several tricks - protected by bottle, leftover food nearby (which is devoured immediately).
Many of us have already cultivated, we have never seen so many slugs in a garden.
I remind you that we had leveled the ground in March 2019: the ground was virgin, hard,

March 2019:
Image

November 2019:
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June 2020:

Image Image
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emilio57
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Re: Our Participatory Garden in Moselle




View emilio57 » 25/06/20, 22:07

here is a small video to present the project.





and the garden in early June:
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Did67
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Re: Our Participatory Garden in Moselle




View Did67 » 26/06/20, 15:50

Well, if there are carnations of India, it is that the slugs calm down ??? The orange slugs are addicted !!!
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Re: Our Participatory Garden in Moselle




View emilio57 » 26/06/20, 21:21

Did67 wrote:Well, if there are carnations of India, it is that the slugs calm down ??? The orange slugs are addicted !!!

It is the stock. Put on tray. They don't attack too much. Elsewhere they actually love it.

I start to get the slug. It is really a story of imbalance in fact.
In a tank with radishes and rocket where I'm sure I don't have a big subject, I eliminate babies, a few millimeters, dozens a day,
It is because of the absence of predator
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Did67
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Re: Our Participatory Garden in Moselle




View Did67 » 26/06/20, 21:52

These beautiful borders are, from my point of view, an obstacle ...

Now you also need patience ... Let them come. From somewhere. Settle in. And stay !!! It's a bit random.

We can brake. Borders (carabids, staphylins). Grills (hedgehogs). Etc ...

Or we can help: shelters, tall grass, wetlands (toads, orvets, salamanders ...). Old wood. Dry stone walls (lizards) ...

Alas, "indoctrination" and "modes" rather lead to squares - thus amplifying the problem! And we are going to look for the "remedy" ...
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sicetaitsimple
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Re: Our Participatory Garden in Moselle




View sicetaitsimple » 26/06/20, 22:28

Did67 wrote:These beautiful borders are, from my point of view, an obstacle ...


We talked about it if I remember correctly a few pages earlier a few months ago. This project is intended (if I understood correctly) to welcome in a place of life elderly people, disabled people, people in reintegration, children, families, ... to have a pleasant time and / or It is therefore necessary to have aisles wide enough to facilitate movement, clear "limits" for cultivated areas, .... because they are not gardeners to begin with, and they come there occasionally.

It is up to the Caribbean and others to get rid of it! We count on them!
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Did67
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Re: Our Participatory Garden in Moselle




View Did67 » 26/06/20, 22:52

I don't always remember ... I knew it was collective.

Note that at home, no frames, but visitors ... I must admit that I have asked such and such a person not to "dance" too much on my basil plants - I must also say that I have them. had planted along the driveway, driveway side! [I'm talking about basil]

Then it's just choices !!! That must be done knowingly. You can choose to have a beautiful, well-framed garden. And maybe to struggle a little more with the slugs ... Or the reverse. I don't want to impose my point of view! On the other hand, I would continue to scratch this fashion, which is only a business allowing to sell 25 € 4 boards which are worth 5! Because the majority of people would be incapable of putting forward a serious argument as to the usefulness of these boards at 25 € but with the lifespan of 5 years (I am optimistic!).
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sicetaitsimple
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Re: Our Participatory Garden in Moselle




View sicetaitsimple » 26/06/20, 23:01

Although I agree with you in substance, I just wanted to emphasize (given what I understood from this project) that criteria different from those which apply to a personal garden could become structuring.
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