The lazy man's orchard: get more than organic fruit without tiring

Agriculture and soil. Pollution control, soil remediation, humus and new agricultural techniques.
Rajqawee
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The lazy man's orchard: get more than organic fruit without tiring




by Rajqawee » 01/06/21, 15:40

I created this thread by shamefully repeating the title of the thread of the vegetable garden.

Considering the success of the other thread, this one seems to me to have its place, right? In addition, this would allow more visibility by possibly locking certain subjects in the garden.

If it seems unnecessary, say so and delete the topic.

I suggest that all fruits from plants with "high branches" are concerned here (we leave in the kitchen garden fruits of "low cultivation" such as red fruits, melons, watermelons .... just for the sake of categorization)

I am launching a first subject: on our future land, I am of course considering fruit production. My land being 2000m², I don't want to consider an orchard that is too large either. It turns out that I have, facing south, a small opposite with a neighboring house. This will technically be the "bottom" of my land, so I am considering a fruit hedge, of reduced height (2m max), so as not to cut off my view of the Pyrenees behind either;)


Has anyone ever tested fruits this way? In hedge?

Come on, let's get motivated! The competition is tough, the other thread is 2000 pages :D
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Re: The sloth's orchard: get more than ORGANIC fruit without getting tired




by Christophe » 01/06/21, 16:17

So that interests me and I want to test on my macro raspberries, blackcurrants and redcurrants (no macro there is nothing sexual about you there!) ... that's all I have in fruit ... uh are the berries high enough?

I have an apple tree and it has been lethargic since it was planted more than 10 years ago ... so without much hope but if it can boost it a little ??? (I had already put mowing remains at his feet)

I'll take pictures ...
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Re: The sloth's orchard: get more than ORGANIC fruit without getting tired




by SixK » 01/06/21, 17:18

For fruit trees in hedges, there are columnar trees.
a specialty from Delbard (you can find it at jardiland, green store and normally truffle):
https://www.georgesdelbard.com/store/ar ... olonnaires

These are trees with a weak root system, we can stick some every 80cm depending on the variety.

Not yet tasted the fruits, I couldn't tell you right away if the taste side follows.

Then there are the trellised fruit trees which can serve as a hedge (mainly pear and apple trees).

The "liana" trees like the vine or the kiwi.
The hazel tree, otherwise it works well in hedges.

For all these fruit trees, I am not sure that there are leaves left in winter, however.
For evergreen foliage, the lemon tree (and in general, citrus fruits) should be able to do the trick. (on the other hand it holds up to -4 to -8 ° C at best for the best acclimatized)

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Re: The sloth's orchard: get more than ORGANIC fruit without getting tired




by Christophe » 01/06/21, 18:33

This is my home ...

2 SOUTH facing blackcurrants (in the shade of a willow tree in the morning)

blackcurrant.jpg
cassis.jpg (434.14 KiB) Viewed 431 times


My raspberry forest. I had planted lots of plants and kinds 10 years ago ... like 5 or 6 varieties but only one ended up adapting well and reproducing on this piece of land, orientation WEST and land shared with nettles (which I pick from time to time) and in front of red hazelnuts:

raspberry.jpg


My rickety apple tree that is turning 14 ... what a shame! Well he probably lacked a little size but still ... there is a problem elsewhere !! : Cry:

apple tree.jpg
pommier.jpg (409.59 KiB) Viewed 431 times


Currants in Macro (this one grows well but nothing or almost nothing this year because of the late frost)

macro.jpg
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Re: The sloth's orchard: get more than ORGANIC fruit without getting tired




by Biobomb » 01/06/21, 23:45

Rajqawee wrote:
If it seems unnecessary, say so and delete the topic.

I am considering a fruit hedge, of reduced height (2m max)

Has anyone ever tested fruits this way? In hedge?

Come on, let's get motivated! The competition is tough, the other thread is 2000 pages :D


very good subject.

watch out for the fruit hedge, apple trees, pear trees, etc .... It's beautiful to see but difficult to dominate. With the hedge there is no laziness possible!
It is imperative to know how to prune these trees, in winter, in summer, otherwise you are quickly overwhelmed by their height. Slowing down the vigor of a fruit tree is not easy.
Choosing the right rootstocks is very important. Plant the trees straight or tilted?
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Re: The sloth's orchard: get more than ORGANIC fruit without getting tired




by Biobomb » 01/06/21, 23:48

Christophe wrote:This is my home ...



My rickety apple tree that is turning 14 ... what a shame! Well he probably lacked a little size but still ... there is a problem elsewhere !!



You give me this apple tree and in a few years, between 2 and 5 years, I'll do something good with it!
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Re: The sloth's orchard: get more than ORGANIC fruit without getting tired




by Christophe » 02/06/21, 00:13

Ahah very funny ... rather give your tips here so that it performs better at home ...

I promise I'll send you 1kg of apples in 4 years : Cheesy:
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Re: The sloth's orchard: get more than ORGANIC fruit without getting tired




by Rajqawee » 02/06/21, 08:50

Concerning the hedge, is it that many interventions per year?

I imagined (maybe stupidly) that it actually represented a size to limit the height, but one size per year is not the end of the world ... especially if we compare to a classic hedge that it must also prune 1 to 2 times a year, but that it does not produce anything except leaves!

And then I do not know, I like the idea of ​​a row of peach trees, apple trees, pear trees ... a bit in a mess, which give fruit!

I did of course educate myself a little, I saw the Bouché-Thomas method, of which I do not dispute the results but of which I do not fully understand the principle: does the utility lie in the fact that the trees , inclined meet? Or is it the angle of the branches that favors fruit setting? Both ?
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Re: The sloth's orchard: get more than ORGANIC fruit without getting tired




by pi-r » 02/06/21, 20:16

I am not proficient in fruit trees ... but there is one that offers a great diversity, which forgives a lot of mistakes, and who happily supports pruning even if they are not made in the rules of the art: the FIG TREE!
mine have put up with it all over the years ....
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Re: The sloth's orchard: get more than ORGANIC fruit without getting tired




by Biobomb » 02/06/21, 23:26

Christophe wrote:Ahah very funny ...

must I take this remark to what degree? : Mrgreen:
I saved others than this one, but I was there.

Tips, here I do not know masses, the experience I prefer. But wouldn't the tree lack some elementary care?
without basic care, without precaution, there is no miracle to be expected.
What is rootstock? is it suitable for your type of soil? is it suitable for quick fruit setting or not? is it a high-rod?
the trunk is bent, why? when it was planted were its roots correct?
how was it planted? in the rules of art ? is it a grafted tree from a nursery? Does this variety require a pollinator? Is it suitable for your region?

I see it in bloom, what happens to them during the season? Are they eaten by predators or victims of fungi?
Are the fruits affected by scab? of the monilia? powdery mildew?
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