Agriculture: problems and pollution, new technologies and solutionsLe Potager du Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Agriculture and soil. Pollution control, soil remediation, humus and new agricultural techniques.
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izentrop
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby izentrop » 12/01/19, 15:48

A few cm, it depends
a different distribution of copper according to the organs, ranging from a high concentration in the roots to a more modulated concentration in the aerial parts. https://prodinra.inra.fr/?locale=es#!Co ... ice:198044
Without tillage there is in fact a distribution also in depth, not to mention the work of burrowers.

Finally, as seen on the GIS map, a Bordeaux mixture in the Bordeaux region should not be a problem if soil analyzes and doses are well managed. : Wink:
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby Did67 » 12/01/19, 16:51

I no longer have the references at hand, but I remember a serious study (INRA ???) which showed that 80 or 90% of the copper brought to high dose in viticulture it seems to me, was found in the 10 first cm.

For my calculation, I took 20 cm.

In the summary you put, it is not clear how copper is applied. Obviously, it seems to be potted trials on cuttings... Very peculiar. I guess this is the measure of foliar treatments (which can have a phytotoxic effect). The doses are in μM (micro-moles, but μM by what? Liter? Foot? Kg?) ... Unexploitable like that. I did not find the report in extenso to understand.

There is a lot of data in this thesis, with page 25, the soil contents (which interest me), depending on whether it is an uncontaminated soil, contaminated soil plowed (the front actually goes down but it is not more reassuring, even if it is a little less marked - dilution?) or contaminated soil not plowed. We see that we cross the toxic 150 ppm for worms, of course for mushrooms ... And that we are in an order of magnitude having nothing to do with the needs! No need to argue about it to defend copper!

index.php? mark_notification = 107168 & hash = c0528c91


PS: I answer, but you note that my intention was to underline the delicate slip of the marketing, which already acts that the copper is also toxic (and thus which dissimulates this in the eyes of the consumer not very curious, but which could have been alerted by the media!)
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby Julienmos » 14/01/19, 01:42

I wonder for some time already about the virtual absence of blackbirds in the kitchen garden behind me ... I see constantly magpies, crows, small passerines ... but no more merle!

and now the report is included in an article in my journal ... with the explanation https://www.republicain-lorrain.fr/edit ... merle-noir
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby to be chafoin » 14/01/19, 04:46

Julienmos wrote:I wonder for some time already about the virtual absence of blackbirds in the kitchen garden behind me ... I see constantly magpies, crows, small passerines ... but no more merle!

and now the report is included in an article in my journal ... with the explanation https://www.republicain-lorrain.fr/edit ... merle-noir
I did not know that the blackbird was the
friend of the gardener, for his appetence for slugs
. Otherwise I always cross here and I hope that it will last despite this virus.
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby Did67 » 14/01/19, 09:57

I had not been careful, but now that you say it!

I attend battles between magpies and woodpeckers, in the meadow in front of my window ...

In the garden, it's calm. But hey, I'm not planting right now, so I'm not paying attention!
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby izentrop » 14/01/19, 11:26

Julienmos wrote:I wonder for some time already about the virtual absence of blackbirds in the kitchen garden behind me ... I see constantly magpies, crows, small passerines ... but no more merle!

and now the report is included in an article in my journal ... with the explanation https://www.republicain-lorrain.fr/edit ... merle-noir
I noticed too.

They used to return the mulch in search of worms, but I also have many more magpies than before ... I put it on the count of the greedy magpies of eggs of blackbirds, they must all likewise participate in the hecatomb.

Usually in January, I often attended male fights for a female ... Still not seen this year. :?:
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby Moindreffor » 15/01/19, 08:37

little question for Didier
can you give us news of your trials of asparagus and dandelion?
merci

and another for everyone, I have a little bit (2 m2) the lawn that I want to turn into a kitchen garden, the problem this little end is north, but then north, behind the garden shed, what can I put? I had thought of wild strawberries ...
merci
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby Did67 » 15/01/19, 10:18

1) Asparagus: there were losses by the mole rats; they like the roots a fleshy stink (called "claws"). The rest is developing well, even very well. A problem of stability. They should be guarded. If they were all there, I would horizontally extend one of the metal trellises used for the concrete slabs. The first two years, we do not harvest, to let the products of photosynthesis claws for them to develop. Finally, when they are not covered, the spears are very quickly "hard". So you have to harvest them as you go. Basically, it works.

2) I had very few times of the "roots" (amochées) that I had put in fine soil 2017. Some have rotten. The 2018 drought decimated others. And this fall, nothing fucked.

This is therefore drifting.

But with minimal attention, it would work.

We must "plant" the plants in the spring, not in the fall. That it makes beautiful and big dandelions during the year.

A "black" point, however: the leaves are "scattered" in the hay; by harvesting, we lose. And it's a boring to clean !!! When I get into it seriously, I think I'll force them into a cellar or a black tarpaulin. So row crop, in hay. Recover the roots in the fall, put winnowing to force. Or cover on the spot black tarpaulin.
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby Moindreffor » 15/01/19, 16:33

Did67 wrote:1) Asparagus: there were losses by the mole rats; they like the roots a fleshy stink (called "claws"). The rest is developing well, even very well. A problem of stability. They should be guarded. If they were all there, I would horizontally extend one of the metal trellises used for the concrete slabs. The first two years, we do not harvest, to let the products of photosynthesis claws for them to develop. Finally, when they are not covered, the spears are very quickly "hard". So you have to harvest them as you go. Basically, it works.

2) I had very few times of the "roots" (amochées) that I had put in fine soil 2017. Some have rotten. The 2018 drought decimated others. And this fall, nothing fucked.

This is therefore drifting.

But with minimal attention, it would work.

We must "plant" the plants in the spring, not in the fall. That it makes beautiful and big dandelions during the year.

A "black" point, however: the leaves are "scattered" in the hay; by harvesting, we lose. And it's a boring to clean !!! When I get into it seriously, I think I'll force them into a cellar or a black tarpaulin. So row crop, in hay. Recover the roots in the fall, put winnowing to force. Or cover on the spot black tarpaulin.

merci
so for asparagus the next season should be the first harvest?
for the dandelions you would force that like endive wholesale?

and if not for my corner in the northern shadow of ideas?
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Re: The Kitchen Garden Sloth: Gardening without fatigue more than Bio

Unread Messageby phil12 » 15/01/19, 16:51

Hello Phenos!

A good little free course of Mr Selosse 6h40 to start the year, Did you beat in length : Mrgreen: :( but the longer it is, the better it is)
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