An immortal jellyfish: even stronger than the Tardigrade?

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An immortal jellyfish: even stronger than the Tardigrade?




by Christophe » 19/05/13, 20:56

Researchers have found a jellyfish Turritopsis nutricula ...immortal, so even stronger than the tardigrade which was already not bad!

So, remains more than to understand and apply the method to man and ... and ... humanity will be immortal (the richest first, the others then) ... and we will be in a beautiful social shit!

Will the special envoy's prophecy on eternal life come true sooner than expected? https://www.econologie.com/forums/bio-nanote ... t7153.html

See as well: https://www.econologie.com/forums/a-mort-la- ... 12264.html

Information certainly much more interesting than gay marriage ... but nobody talks about it!


The jellyfish Turritopsis nutricula, discovered for the first time by biology researchers from the University of Lecce, is believed to have originated in the Caribbean Sea and is now spreading across the seas of the globe.

According to scientific research, she is the only immortal living being. Thus, this jellyfish would be able to go back in time, passing from an advanced life phase to a younger life phase, by blocked apoptosis and trans-differentiation mechanisms, thus reconfiguring its failing cells into new and perfect cells
. Unknown for a very long time, these singular jellyfish were difficult to find since they only evolve in deep waters, and, as they cannot die, these jellyfish multiplied across the oceans of the whole world, causing an almost supernatural panic in the international scientific community to the point that Doctor Maria Miglietta of the Smithsonian Tropical Marine Institute told reporters: "We are preparing for a silent global invasion. "

A threat or an ally?

Due to its exceptional characteristics, this jellyfish is the subject of studies by biologists and geneticists since it is the only living complex organism known to date capable of completely reversing its aging process.

But this potential immortality worries scientists, however, because it would be responsible for the excessive growth of its species in the waters of the globe. Legends surround this jellyfish, many testimonies around the world lend it psychic phenomena of all kinds. Is it its immortality which provokes a real colonization of all the seas by this jellyfish? Difficult to answer this question at the moment. On the other hand, it is certain that the jellyfish Turritopsis nutricula spreads in all the waters of the globe in a considerable way every year.

A key to becoming immortal

The studies carried out on the jellyfish Turritopsis nutricula pushed scientists to find a way to reproduce the process of tissue renewal in human beings, even to give life again ... Furthermore, this immortal jellyfish has the answer that would allow cure man of any disease by creating anti-aging drugs.

The world of immortals, soon a reality?

Two scientific schools compete, one tells us that man is unsurpassable and that his mutation must be the biocyborg, that is to say the addition of technologies which boost his capacities; the other teaches that everything is already in our genes, asleep, that it is enough to find in us the means to implement our capacities which would be immense, like the capacity to rejuvenate, via a particular cellular process. Which school wins, the future will provide the answer.

However the journalists of WikiStrike think that it will be the first, because the scientific school which sees the overtaking of man by the cyborg will allow to give power to the multinationals which will have the nanotechnologies and other chips of this new superman market under code -bar, pseudo-god who will only be a passionate slave of body-tuning.

The other scientific school would give absolute freedom to everyone and for free, so imagine the heads of your bankers and your bosses! Have mercy, think of them, and bow down out of compassion! ... Or not!

William McAtbash for WikiStrike

source:

Turritopsis nutricula McCrady 1857 - Encyclopedia of Life

Bavestrello, Giorgio; Christian Sommer and Michele Sarà (1992). "Bi-directional conversion in Turritopsis nutricula (Hydrozoa)". Scientia Marina 56 (2-3): 137-140.

Piraino, Stefano; F. Boero, B. Aeschbach, V. Schmid (1996). "Reversing the life cycle: medusae transforming into polyps and cell transdifferentiation in Turritopsis nutricula (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa)". Biological Bulletin (Biological Bulletin, Vol. 190, No. 3) 190 (3): 302-312.doi: 10.2307 / 1543022. JSTOR 1543022.

Gilbert, Scott F. (2006). "Cheating Death: The Immortal Life Cycle of Turritopsis". Retrieved 2009-03-22.

Ker Than (January 29, 2009). "" Immortal "Jellyfish Swarm World's Oceans". National Geographic News. Retrieved 2010-06-16.

Kramp, PL. "Synopsis of the medusae of the world". Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 40: 1-469.

Mintowt-Czyz, Lech (January 26, 2009). "Turritopsis nutricula: the world's only 'immortal' creature". Times Online. Retrieved 2009-03-22.

Fraser, C. McLean (1937). Hydroids of the Pacific Coast of Canada and the United States. University of Toronto Press. p.p. 201 plus 44 plates.

Schuchert, Peter. "Turritopsis rubra". Retrieved January 23, 2010.

"'Immortal' jellyfish swarming across the world". Telegraph Media Group. January 27, 2009. Retrieved 2010-06-16.

Miglietta, MP; S. Piraino, S. Kubota, P. Schuchert (2006). "Species in the genus Turritopsis (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa): a molecular evaluation". Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research 45 (1): 11-19. doi: 10.1111 / j.1439-0469.2006.00379.x.

Mills, CE (1983). "Vertical migration and diel activity patterns of hydromedusae: studies in a large tank". Journal of Plankton Research 5 (5): 619-635. doi: 10.1093 / plankt / 5.5.619.

Dimberu, Peniel M .. "Immortal Jellyfish Provides Clues for Regenerative Medicine". Singularity Hub. Retrieved October 26, 2011.

Than, Ker. "" Immortal "Jellyfish Swarm World's Oceans". National Geographic Society. Retrieved October 26, 2011.


Source: http://www.wikistrike.com/article-une-m ... 80694.html
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Re: An immortal jellyfish: even stronger than the Tardigrad




by moinsdewatt » 19/05/13, 21:13

The jellyfish Turritopsis nutricula, discovered for the first time by biology researchers from the University of Lecce, is believed to have originated in the Caribbean Sea and is now spreading across the seas of the globe.
....................


If this jellyfish is immortal why then it would now spread in all the seas of the globe precisely at this time ????

Its predator has disappeared due to human disturbance?
Or what ?
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by Christophe » 19/05/13, 21:27

I made the same thought, if it was immortal it should have colonized all the oceans for a long time ... but it is not because it is immortal that it does not die because of other reasons and that she can live anywhere and however ...

Maybe warming has something to do with it (modification of deep sea currents, the gulf stream has its source in the Caribbean ...)?

The referenced studies may have the answer, you have to find them ...
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by sen-no-sen » 19/05/13, 22:43

In reality there are many trees that are immortal, such as the
trembling aspen or gingko of which we do not currently know any specimen dead of old age.

moinsdewatt wrote:

If this jellyfish is immortal why then it would now spread in all the seas of the globe precisely at this time ????


Immortal does not mean indestructible, nuance.
The proliferation of jellyfish is the direct consequence of overfishing, it is now a global phenomenon.
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by Christophe » 19/05/13, 22:54

sen-no-sen wrote:In reality there are many trees that are immortal, such as the
trembling aspen or gingko of which we do not currently know any specimen dead of old age.


Except that a plant is still much less close to us than a jellyfish ...

sen-no-sen wrote:The proliferation of jellyfish is the direct consequence of overfishing, it is now a global phenomenon.


What is the causal link?

Dolphins eat jellyfish but other fish?

In addition this jellyfish comes from the depths ... where the fishing is still quite limited ...
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by sen-no-sen » 19/05/13, 23:08

Christophe wrote:What is the causal link?


The link is obvious!
By removing entire sections of the food chain, it follows an imbalance resulting in an increase in the number of jellyfish.
The warming of the waters helping, the jellyfish have free tables!


In addition this jellyfish comes from the depths ... where the fishing is still quite limited ...


Deep-sea fishing is commonplace these days, precisely because of the depletion of surface fish stocks:
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C3%AAche_profonde
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by Christophe » 19/05/13, 23:15

obvious ... not that much ... the caught fish must still be proven predators of the jellyfish!

This one measuring only 4 to 5 mm ( http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turritopsis_nutricula ) indeed it can be the prey of many species of fish!

Yes for deep fishing but it does not yet constitute a large tonnage I think ... compared to the conventional!

It's serious anyway ...
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by sen-no-sen » 19/05/13, 23:29

Christophe wrote:obvious ... not that much ... the caught fish must still be proven predators of the jellyfish!

This one measuring only 4 to 5 mm ( http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turritopsis_nutricula ) indeed it can be the prey of many species of fish!

Yes for deep fishing but it does not yet constitute a large tonnage I think ... compared to the conventional!

It's serious anyway ...


Deep-sea fishing represents around 15 million tonnes per year, but still one-tenth of surface fishing.

One of the main predators of the jellyfish is ... bluefin tuna, no cause and effect?

We can obviously add the role of pollution in this state of affairs.
A recent study to demonstrate the increase in the populations of jellyfish in all the seas of the globe a fortiori near the coasts:
http://www.publicaffairs.ubc.ca/2012/04/18/jellyfish-on-the-rise-ubc-study/
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by Christophe » 19/05/13, 23:40

sen-no-sen wrote:One of the main predators of the jellyfish is ... bluefin tuna, no cause and effect?


Ok ok ... except that you have to say "jellyfish" ...

Will eternal life be owed to sushi eaters? :D

sen-no-sen wrote:A recent study to demonstrate the increase in the populations of jellyfish in all the seas of the globe a fortiori near the coasts:
http://www.publicaffairs.ubc.ca/2012/04/18/jellyfish-on-the-rise-ubc-study/


Yes, I read something similar a few weeks ago! The phenomenon is especially noted in Japan with a species that leave tons of corpses on the beaches ... you have to see which one I'm talking about ...
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by Ahmed » 20/05/13, 21:44

This information leaves me ... dumbfounded ...
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